Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

October 29, 2008


Host: Ted Simons

Catching Up with City Councilman Calvin Goode

  |   Video
  • A Phoenix city councilman for 22 years before retiring in 1994, Calvin Goode is the farthest thing from �retired.� HORIZON catches up with this energetic 81-year old, who shows us the projects with which he's involved.
Guests:
  • Calvin Goode - Former Phoenix city councilman


View Transcript
ed Simons
>>> He was a Phoenix city councilman for over 20 years. Tonight we continue our series about life after politics by catching up with Calvin Goode. He was only the second African-American to serve on the Phoenix City Council. He fought to get the city to recognize a holiday for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. And he paved the way for a city ordinance prohibiting workplace discrimination based on race and sexual orientation. As producer David Majure and photographer Richard Torruellas show us, Calvin Goode may be retired, but he isn't slowing down.

David Majure
>> After 22 years as a Phoenix city councilman, Calvin Goode retired from the council in 1994. But he didn't retire completely.

Calvin Goode
>> Well, I feel better if I’m doing something.

Calvin Goode
>> Is it coming along all right?

David Majure
>> He spends a typical day doing quite a lot.

Calvin Goode
>> We will be down to see you. Today I have visitors from channel eight and after that we --

David Majure
>> That happens every day, right?

Calvin Goode
>> Yes, interview every morning.

David Majure
>> While Goode may not always have a camera crew following him around, he certainly is a busy man and he doesn't plan to take it easy.

Calvin Goode
>> I have seen some of my friends here who have sat down and say they're going to take it easy, and then they die.

David Majure
>> With a lot of living to do, Goode continues to fight for what is important to him. Like early childhood education.

Calvin Goode
>> I think the most important investment we can make is in our young people. Starting with this age level. Sometimes they don't have the opportunities at home to work with a lot -- low income parents. They don't always have the skills and so forth to develop the child the way they should develop.

Calvin Goode
>> Bye.

David Majure
>> Goode is vice president of the board for the Booker T. Washington Child Development Center, a head start program that he has been involved with since 1967. The center is building two new classrooms.

Calvin Goode
>> Looks like it is coming along real good.

Worker
>> Thank you, sir.



David Majure
>> Goode is supervising the project and raising money to complete it. Phoenix has been Calvin Goode's home since the mid 1940s.

Calvin Goode
>> It has changed quite a bit, yes.

David Majure
>> As vice president of his neighborhood association, Goode is concerned about the city's rapid growth and how it is affecting his community.

Calvin Goode
>> I call it under siege by developers who want to come in and build high rises and push us out. I feel we have been here a long time, and I don't plan to move anywhere else, but the pressure is on.

David Majure
>> With an eye to the future, Goode keeps a foot in the past. He serves on the board of the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center.

Worker
>> The door is going to be hung and swung on Tuesday --

David Majure
>> As chairman of the facilities committee, Goode is working on renovations to the building.

Calvin Goode
>> Because I have a lot of investment in the building and I think that our young people need to know the contributions that African-Americans have made to this country.

David Majure
>> The museum is devoted to African-American history.

Calvin Goode
>> Do you see this picture here? Did you notice it? One of the high school students did that, and my wife and I bought it and put it there. It tells a story if you understand what happened --

David Majure
>> This building was once a place of segregation, Carver High School, built for the city's African-American students.

Calvin Goode
>> This is a statue of George Washington Carver, the school was named after him. When he died in '43, the citizens decided to change the name.

David Majure
>> Goode graduated from Carver High in 1945 and later worked for the school.

Calvin Goode
>> For five years until they closed it in '54.




David Majure
>> In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that schools segregated by race were unconstitutional. It ended segregated schools, but Goode said it didn't stop the problem.

Calvin Goode
>> In terms of segregation, we probably have more de facto segregation now than we had back before the Supreme Court of 1954, and looking at the different school districts here in Phoenix, for instance, there is still inequities, and I think there perhaps always is going to be inequities.

David Majure
>> That is why Goode continues to support affirmative action and equality for everyone.

Calvin Goode
>> Well, you know, I say as an American citizen, I’m entitled to all of the rights and privileges, and the opportunities, and I don't like to think that I have to fight for them.

David Majure
>> But Goode continues fighting for equal opportunities, affordable housing, and early childhood education. Those same things he has fought for his entire career, only now with a greater sense of urgency.

Calvin Goode
>> Well, I guess I’m a little less patient. I’m 81 years old now. And I'd like to see some of these things get done, you know, in a more timely manner.

Greater Phoenix Forward Report

  |   Video
  • The Arizona State University College of Public Programs and the Morrison Institute have released a new report regarding the future needs of the human services infrastructure in the Valley. ASU Public Programs Dean Debra Friedman talks about the report.
Guests:
  • Debra Friedman - Dean of Public Programs, Arizona State University
Category: Business/Economy

View Transcript

Ted Simons
>>> There is a new report out that talks about changing demographics for the Valley and what needs to be done to meet infrastructure needs in the future. The "Greater Phoenix Forward" report was put out by the Arizona State University College of Public Programs and the Morrison Institute for Public Policy. The report talks about human services already in place and how demographic changes will impact needed services in the future. Earlier, I talked to Debra Friedman, Dean of Public Programs at A.S.U., about the Greater Phoenix Forward report.

Ted Simons
>> And Debra, thank you for joining us on "Horizon."

Debra Friedman
>> My pleasure.

Ted Simons
>> What did this report look for and what did it find?

Debra Friedman
>> Good questions. What we were looking for were ways to help our community understand the human services infrastructure challenges in the next five years. A lot of focus on growth in greater Phoenix, but the implications of that growth on the human side were very much what we were attempting to understand.

Ted Simons
>> And in that sense, the purpose in doing the report is to plan for the future, which is always a moving target.

Debra Friedman
>> Yes, especially challenging in the cases where human beings, rather than say physical infrastructure is under consideration.

Ted Simons
>> Let's start with that. There is a competition when we talk infrastructure, bricks and mortar, and we have dealing with human beings.

Debra Friedman
>> I was actually inspired by how well the Phoenix had planned for, say, transportation. Not necessarily that we have implemented everything, but the planning was quite excellent and also with utilities. I thought wouldn't it be interesting if we applied that same kind of approach to planning on the human services infrastructure side.

Ted Simons
>> It was interesting in the report, Phoenix, the Valley in general, it is not necessarily the land of the snow birds and land of retirees.

Debra Friedman
>> Yes, and that came through very clearly in the report. The age of the population is on average younger than the national average. And that comes as a surprise to many, many people. It is -- it -- we have to prepare for a relatively younger population, rather than a relatively older one. At the same time, of course, the aging population is also growing in size and there is an interesting statistic, for example, the over 85 group is going to double in the coming years.

Ted Simons
>> As far as those young folks though, talk about some of the things that are focused there. I would imagine be everything from families to crime as well.

Debra Friedman
>> Yeah, indeed. Crime is a young person's pursuit. So, if we think about really planning for that five to 14 age group, the largest growing age group relatively, then we have to think about prevention services in drug abuse, mental health, young families. All of those kinds of things. And this report really focuses our attention on what is necessary in order to help those young people move through that period of time successfully.

Ted Simons
>> I notice as well a concern is a lack of systemic data. First of all, what are we talking about there, and, secondly, how do you get the stuff?

Debra Friedman
>> Those are very good questions and very important. The lack of systemic data means that it is very difficult to follow clients through the system, to understand what kinds of interventions they've had that are successful or less successful, and how we can best use our resources to address those -- the needs of those clients. At the same time, one of the things that also comes through is that the human services system is as complicated for the providers as it is for the clients. Because the services come from the city and the county and the state, and also from the nonprofit sector and also from private sectors. It is a very complex environment.



Ted Simons
>> Indeed. And it sounds like just even getting that data is going to cost bucks.

Debra Friedman
>> It is. The thing about it costing bucks is that it costs bucks in perpetuity. In order for it to be successful, there has to be a commitment to keep those data over time infinitely.

Ted Simons
>> Indeed. I notice as well something that, again, is just a part of growth and a part of just evolution here, labor shortages.

Debra Friedman
>> Yes. Particularly poignant for my college, College of Public Programs, because we see for example a shortage coming in both the public sector, but also social workers. Social work shortage is important because social workers are the number one providers of mental health services in the United States. If there are insufficient numbers, where are those services going to come from? We have to start training sufficient numbers of social workers to take the place of those retiring and also meet the growth of population.

Ted Simons
>> Budgeting for human services in tough economic times, that has to be a major challenge.

Debra Friedman
>> It is. When there are tough economic times, more people need the services and there are fewer bucks to apply to them. One of the things, the reception of this report has been quite encouraging, and part of the reason is that public providers and also nonprofit providers want to make sure that their dollars are spent in thoughtful and smart ways. So, understanding what is coming in the future helps them to know where best to spend the next dollar.

Ted Simons
>> How does illegal immigration play into this report and in terms of what you studied and what has to be dealt with in the future?

Debra Friedman
>> Well, there are a variety of sources of population growth, and illegal immigration is hard to estimate, as you know, but it does play in. However, the analysts who dealt with that in the report suggested that illegal immigration is motivated by economic factors, and so, if there are fewer draws here for whatever reason, that population will decrease.

Ted Simons
>> Last question. What do you want to see done with this report?

Debra Friedman
>> We are in phase two now. That is -- we are presenting this report in a variety of places to people who can use the analyses. The third phase will be joint strategic planning between practitioners and the university for preparation, for example, in the labor force shortages, strategic planning by sector, where practitioners who are all dealing with the same kinds of issues, say substance abuse, needs of the elderly, will come together and see how they can best move forward together given the analyses of the challenges that lie ahead.
Ted Simons
>> All right. Very good. Thank you for joining us.

Debra Friedman
>> Thank you for having me.

Voter Registration Fraud

  |   Video
  • With early voting already underway and Election Day approaching, learn about the incidents of voter and voter registration fraud. Patrick Kenney, chair of Arizona State University's Political Science Department, talks about the cases of fraud occurring nationwide.
Guests:
  • Patrick Kenney - Chairman, Political Science department, Arizona State University


View Transcript
Ted Simons
>> Maricopa County is expecting to set records for voter turnout next week. Early voting in the county is already running at a rapid clip. Maricopa County recorder Helen Purcell says she is already seeing lines at early voting satellite locations. And she says about half of the 800,000 mail-in ballots requested have already been turned in. Purcell will be on "Horizon" tomorrow night to talk about voting issues. If you have a lead foot and you'd like to help the state out of its current financial mess, there will soon be more opportunity to do so. By the end of the week, the Arizona Department of Public Safety will have ten new photo enforcement cameras. Here are the new locations that will be added by the end of the week. State Route 51 at Bethany Home, Highland and Thomas road. I-10 westbound at 40th and 24th streets, and eastbound at 16th street and 15th avenue. The other three will be on the U.S. 60 westbound at Gilbert Road, Mesa Drive, and Alma School. Fines from those nabbed by the cameras will go to state coffers.

Ted Simons
>>> As we get closer to the election, it's typical to hear news about voter registration fraud. This election cycle, the talk has centered around the group ACORN which has had some fraudulent voter forms with names such as Mickey Mouse appearing on them. However, the organization did try to ferret out the fraud before national attention was focused on the situation. Here to talk about that case voter fraud and voter registration fraud is Arizona State University Political Science Chair Patrick Kenney.

Patrick Kenney
>> Thank you.

Patrick Kenney
>> It is broad category, voter fraud is a broad category. Two sides, individual level fraud, worrying about with ACORN that people are going to vote that shouldn't, can't, aren't registered, aren't really people. On the other side the tally side that they worry about the organizations, the institutions that monitor and count the ballots. Always worry about that, that people turn in ballots that aren't counted, lost, purposely set aside, counted more than once. Lots of stories about that. Two sides to it, individual voter and the institution.

Ted Simons
>> Voter fraud in general -- historically have we seen a lot of this?

Patrick Kenney
>> Very difficult to know. By almost all accounts, historians, politicians, pundits, definitely some voter fraud that goes along across the United States in pockets of areas in different times. Sensitive about it since 2000, heightened awareness since 2000 because of the problems in Florida.

Ted Simons
>> Things like dead people voting, felons voting, people not having the right identification, using different names. How about hacking into computers; is that a concern?

Patrick Kenney
>> I don't know of any cases of that, but it is certainly a concern. One of the key arguments of all systems moving towards computers. You could hack in there and bother the votes.

Ted Simons
>> With that said, are mistakes, accidents more prevalent, and, again, more of a concern than actually outright fraud?

Patrick Kenney
>> Almost everybody thinks that is the case. We're counting so many ballots. Let me back up. One thing to remember in the United States, the states run the votes, and most of the time that's handed off to the counties, actual execution is at the county level, lots of volunteers there, lots of worries about errors, hard to know how many, oftentimes thought it is kind of randomly distributed, so we don't worry too much about it. Especially the races aren't all that close.

Ted Simons
>> You mentioned ACORN. John McCain's quote was that we could be facing one of the greatest frauds in voter history, and he was referring to ACORN. What is going on here? It sounds to me like a group's contracted with folks to do something, and there may have been nefarious activity there. Does that activity necessarily equate to the wrong people voting and people voting twice and three and four times?

Patrick Kenney
>> Right, not necessarily. What is happening there, they contracted, the people are being paid to actually come up with lists of voters. They generate lists that aren't probably real voters. Since they weren't to begin with, they will not turn up with the polls. They were more concerned about being paid for the number of voters that they came up with.

Ted Simons
>> Headlines that Mickey Mouse is registered to vote in Ohio.

Patrick Kenney
>> Not going to make it, Mickey Mouse is probably not going to make it unless he is registered.

Ted Simons
>> Does it become a wedge issue for whatever party that is having a tougher time of it at the polls?

Patrick Kenney
>> Typically the party behind worries more about it, makes more news about it. A little more news this time, we saw throughout the primary, Democrats are expecting higher levels of turnouts since we maybe have seen since 1960. We will have to see if that is true. Pushing an overall turnout around 60% favoring Obama slightly because a lot of now young voters he has generated to come in there. Republicans worrying to be sure they're all real voters. Old saying in Chicago, vote early and vote often, to be sure those kinds of things don't happen. There is a lot of discussion about it. Both sides are -- lawyers ready to go in case some location is very close and they want to get in and contest those.

Ted Simons
>> Ohio had trouble last time around. I have seen reports that a third of the new registration have some sort of discrepancy. Sometimes a period after an initial that isn't there or should be there, whatever the case may be. How far can you take this in terms of challenging registration and ultimate votes?

Patrick Kenney
>> In the United States, we have a great history of not doing that. We don't tend to contest these elections long after them. Even Al Gore said as soon as the Supreme Court said the vote was to stop there in Florida, he conceded the election. Richard Nixon cited in 1960, lots of irregularities we thought in Illinois, for instance, maybe Texas, and Richard Nixon never contested that vote. Long history that we don't contest them. I don't anticipate there will be that much trouble this year. There is always a pocket, localities, but nationwide, no.

Ted Simons
>> Let's move to voter suppression efforts and how serious those are. Because, again, a lot of activity, conversation that we could be seeing that at certain polling places around the country. What do you think?

Patrick Kenney
>> Historically suppression is a greater issue than fraud. Because the United States went to great lengths in many states and localities to suppress the vote. After the Voting Rights Act was passed in 1965, it is much more difficult to actually suppress the vote. But as you know, the Voting Rights Act still includes -- I should -- 15 to 17 states are still monitored very closely for their vote. Arizona is one of them because of irregularities and violations of Voting Rights Act over time. Those states are monitored very closely. There is always a worry about that because we have a history of that, and some allegations that turned up again in Miami in 2000.

Ted Simons
>> Talk to us about this, examples that we have heard where people say if you show up at the polls there will be police there to check your I.D. if you have an outstanding warrant, they will pick you up --

Patrick Kenney
>> Those worries are going on. We see little of that. Suppression is more when it was more legal to suppress, ways to keep people from the polls, registration issues, those kinds of things. That has shifted a little about fear of going to the poll. One area that there is some concern about that would be in the Latino community, right, that they would be pressed and pushed on their citizenship at the time that they go. Study done by honor students at A.S.U., looked at states that passed more restrictive measures to number of forms of I.D.s and things, and they didn't find hardly any voter fraud in the states they were looking at.

Ted Simons
>> Interesting. New Hampshire allows people to sign up to vote at the polls. What do you think of that idea?

Patrick Kenney
>> A lot of people have talked about that. Great study done by folks at Berkeley, 20 years old now, shows roughly 10% of the population shows up to vote, thinking they're registered, might cost as much as 10, 15 million votes at any given year, a lot of people say you ought to be able to register, election day registration. I think we could monitor it, but it would be expensive and complicated.

Ted Simons
>> Election, landslide either way or it is nip and tuck all of the way. It is -- common sense dictates that if it is nip and tuck, we will see more in the way of accusations and allegations.

Patrick Kenney
>> That's right. That is where the concern will come in. If it is a landslide, even broader than nip and tuck, two, three percent, that will generate a broader victory in the Electoral College. The popular vote might have been a couple of percent.

Ted Simons
>> If you had -- about a minute here -- if you had to look forward and make some sort of prediction or just look -- what are you most worried -- what do you think will come up in terms of this election as being who knew that a hanging chad would be a problem back then? Is there something out there that you are worried about more than others?

Patrick Kenney
>> Given the polls right now, if they're correct, great configuration of national polls moving in the same direction, show Obama up in a number of states, six, seven, eight, even nine points, if that is true, I don't think we will be worried about voter fraud.

Ted Simons
>> Thank you for joining us.

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