Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

October 30, 2006


Host: Michael Grant

Arizona Corporation Commission


  • HORIZON gives the five candidates running for the two seats on the Arizona Corporation Commission an opportunity to explain why you should vote for them.
Guests:
  • Kathy Schwarz - Arizona League of Women Voters
  • Beverly Weiss - American Association of University Women
Category: Elections

View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on Horizon both major political parties investing time and money to recruit women into the political process. And the Arizona Corporation Commission regulates utilities. We have statements from the five Corporation Commission candidates. That's coming up on Horizon.

Announcer:
Horizon is made possible by contributions from the friends of eight, members of your Arizona PBS Station. Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Good evening. Thanks for joining us tonight on Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. In the news today the Republican nominee for state attorney general Bill Montgomery is going to have to surrender $43,000 of his public campaign funding. That is the settlement approved today by the Citizens Clean Elections Commission. The commission determined that Montgomery should not have used primary election funding to tape a commercial on primary election day and then pay for broadcasting it. Women may constitute more than 50\% of the population but they aren't represented nearly as actively in elective office. Both Democrats and Republicans working to change that. Larry Lemmons takes a look at two programs designed to get women involved.

Larry Lemmons:
Angie Crouse has a political future ahead of her. Lately she's been working on the campaign to send Harry Mitchell to Congress. Mitchell is trying to unseat Incumbent J.D. Hayworth. That's one of three campaigns in which she's involved. She tried to win a seat in the state legislature this year but lost in the Democratic primary.

Angie Crouse:
Yes, it was disappointing. And yes, I will run again to answer the most common questions. However, what I ended up coming away with were some great skills and great abilities. I now have no problem speaking in public. I can do fundraising. I can go talk to a bunch of strangers I can walk into a roomful of people I don't know and start talking to them. These are all great skills. Then I'm also translating a lot of those skills into working on three different campaigns now.

Larry Lemmons:
The political skills she obtained Crouse attributes to her experience with Emerge Arizona.

Dana Kennedy:
We've been in operation over three years now. We have recruited and trained three classes of graduates. 40 women have gone through and graduated through the program. And of those 40 women, we are amazed that we had ten candidates running this year alone.

Larry Lemmons:
Emerge originally began in San Francisco but expanded to Arizona. It's a six-month training program meeting once a month to train Democratic women.

Dana Kennedy:
And we teach them basically campaign skills. We teach them public speaking skills. We teach them how to frame a message. We teach them fundraising. We teach them clean elections. We teach them how to network, how to work a room, all the skills that are necessary if you're going to run for office.

Angie Crouse:
Honestly if it wasn't for Emerge I wouldn't be standing here today.

Larry Lemmons:
Democrats may have a head start in Arizona but Republicans are quickly mobilizing. Tucson's Christine Olson who's visiting the phoenix GOP Headquarters will launch her program originally begun in Pennsylvania in January. The program is called "The Dodie Londen Excellence for Public Service" series.

Christine Olson:
We're announcing the program on January 26. Applications will be due on April 1 and we hope to have our first-class start next fall.

Larry Lemmons:
Speaking here with Gubernatorial Candidate Len Munsil, Olson says interested women should take notice.

Christine Olson:
Well, we have an advisory board. And what we will be doing from today on is going around the state talking about this program and asking people to put names forward of people that might be interested in going through this -- through this school. And then they will apply. And they will be interviewed by our advisory board. And then they were selected. All of the -- basically all of the cost is picked up by our organization. There's a minimal fee of an application fee of about $200. But other than that, there's really no expense to the student.

Larry Lemmons:
The Emerge Arizona program costs $350. In an earlier interview, Crouse talked about her first experience as a candidate.

Angie Crouse:
I was going door to door for several hours in a row on Friday night, Saturday morning, Saturday night, Sunday morning, Sunday night, for 18 hours to talk to voters. And I thought, oh, this is why everyone says it's such hard work. And it is. And being a woman I have an additional talent, and that is for safety reasons I always have to have someone to walk with me. Many of the other challengers that are men that are running, I know that they walk by themselves and they don't even worry about. It so if someone cancels on me it's a quick scramble to find someone else. Another moment was when I was driving down the street even though I helped put up my signs for the first time driving down the streets and seeing them up it was like, wow, I'm really a candidate.

Larry Lemmons:
Win or lose that kind of experience is invaluable. Obviously women are a potent political force. Which is why organizers of both programs say the most valuable aspect of the experience for Democrats and Republicans is that women are getting involved and motivated.

Christine Olson:
Because at the end of the day, when I'm watching the election returns. I'm a nerd. I sit up late and watch all the returns come in. At the end of the day when I get upset it's because I'm worried about what policies are going to be decided in our legislature that are going to affect my kids and then my grandchildren if I'm lucky enough to have them. And I think more and more women are waking up to that. And as we're -- a lot of us have two income families now; healthcare is so important, childcare, education. All issues that resound with women. So that's why it's becoming more and more apparent we need more women in the process.

Meg Burton-Cahill:
I believe our public policy would be different across the country. State level public policy, if there were more women, minorities and working people involved. Involved as elected officials.

Angie Crouse:
We do have sort of an imbalance on the state legislature as well as congress. And since women are a little bit more than half the population, I think that the population should then be represented by true representation. And that is let's try to make it 50/50. Half women, half men. Women also bring a whole different perspective and a whole different view to politics and to the world. And so we need to be able to be there to have a seat at the table.

Michael Grant:
Here with us to talk about getting women involved in the political process is Kathy Schwarz from the Arizona League of Women Voters and Beverly Weiss of American Association of University Women. Both organizations are nonpartisan. Beverly, another way women being encouraged to get involved is the Running and Winning Program? What's that?

Beverly Weiss:
Yes. This is a new program that we're having for the first time in the valley. It's presented by -- jointly with the League of Women Voters and the American Association of University Women. What the program aims to do is to interest young women in the political process and also to think about it in terms of possible careers for themselves. The program is for junior and senior young women in high school.

Michael Grant:
In high school?

Beverly Weiss:
And will be presented this time for the first time in the valley at Coronado high school on November the 15th.

Michael Grant:
Now, Kathy, we tend to think of this in terms of elective office. I suppose -- obviously there are a lot of different positions that can be occupied. Appointive office at high levels as well.

Kathy Schwarz:
Well, that's right. And I think one of the things that we hope the girls learn is they may not want to run for elective office but they certainly can help with other people's campaigns or get involved in other organizations that promote women running for office. You don't have to necessarily run for office yourself to get very involved in helping with campaigns.

Michael Grant:
Beverly, why do you think that women need to be urged more than men?

Beverly Weiss:
Well, I think it has something of perhaps to do with our culture, to begin with, that we tend to look back. You hear a lot about the founding fathers but not so much about founding mothers. [Laughter]

Michael Grant:
Well, that's a good point.

Beverly Weiss:
And so I think in general we have sort of -- we may have tended to feel that way about it in the past. But part of what we're trying to do with running and winning is let the young women see that there are role models right now that they will be able to talk to. We're going to bring elected officials to the high school on November the 15th and the girls are going to be able to interview them and find out about, well, why did you run for office. And what kind of skills do you have to have to run for office.

Michael Grant:
Kathy we were talking before we went on the air here that although Arizona numbers are still not 50/50, Arizona actually has had some relatively impressive statistics from time to time over the past 10, 15 years.

Kathy Schwarz:
We certainly have. And as we stand now I think we rank third in the nation in terms of the number of women represented. And that's primarily at state office level. We have no one in congressional office. But at the state level we're about 33.3\% of the offices are held by women. So that's a pretty good record. We're number three. I think Maryland and Delaware are ahead of us.

Michael Grant:
Now, Beverly, tell us a little bit more about the American Association of University Women.

Beverly Weiss:
The American Association of University Women is the oldest organization that has worked to improve education for women. And it works at all levels. We have branches and members in every state and many, many cities. And we work to bring educational programs and to bring equity into the educational process.

Michael Grant:
You know, I've got a little note here from Larry Lemmons, our producer. There's a story that A.A.U.W. actually gave money to Marie Curie to buy radium?

Beverly Weiss:
Yes. That's actually a historical fact. People like to find these little gems that show how much we were on the ball for a very, very long time.

Michael Grant:
Well, its money well spent. I don't know if anyone has ever told you that before.

Beverly Weiss:
Right. And one of the stories that amuses me about the early times is that two of the women who were involved in founding A.A.U.. Were women who graduated from M.I.T.

Michael Grant:
Oh.

Beverly Weiss:
And considering, you know, that we're talking about the 19th century here, that's a long time ago.

Michael Grant:
Yes. Especially for M.I.T

Beverly Weiss:
Right. One of the women actually was able to complete all of the course work for a PhD. But they refused to give her the PhD. to set a precedent as giving degrees of that magnitude to women.

Michael Grant:
Kathy, obviously League of Women Voters has been around for a long time, too. Going back to what, 1920?

Kathy Schwarz:
1920 right after the passage of the 19th amendment. But the league in spirit goes back a lot further than that, to really to 1848 with the Suffragist Movement, they wrote, they carried banners. The first group to actually demonstrate in front of the white house were members of the Women Suffrage Movement. They were jailed, put in solitary, tortured. So you see they've got a rather earnest history.

Michael Grant:
Sure.

Kathy Schwarz:
And when they finally earned the right to vote the Suffrage Group formed the League of Women Voters. It was hoped very much and I think we succeeded in getting women educated, informed and independent voters.

Michael Grant:
That certainly is my impression that league I think has taken a lot and I think it's a good approach of information about the process can be inspirational in and of itself.

Kathy Schwarz:
Oh, absolutely. And I know as we speak our telephones are ringing off the hooks with people wanting to know where they should vote where they can get voter information. If people can come and talk about the propositions. So we're still doing a good job of educating people for their informed voters.

Michael Grant:
Okay. Kathy Schwarz thank you very much for joining us. Beverly Weiss our thanks to you as well.

Michael Grant:
The five members of the Arizona Corporation Commission oversee some very vital services in our state. They watch over the cost of electricity and natural gas, also the safety of pipelines that bring us gas and oil. The commission's policies determine the rates you pay for telecommunications and water. The panel also oversees corporations, securities and railroad safety. Some have described the corporation commission as the fourth branch of government because of its wide-reaching jurisdiction. On November 7, voters are going to see the names of five people seeking seats on the commission. The two top vote getters win. Horizon gave the candidates an opportunity to ask you for your vote.

Richard Boyer:
Hello. I'm Rick Boyer and I'm asking for your vote to elect me to Arizona's Corporation Commission. My experience as an Arizona judge, three-term state senator and an attorney have prepared me well for the challenges facing the Corporation Commission in our great state. As a veteran I will fight for you against the rate shock of higher utility rates. Ensure that Arizonans have affordable and adequate energy and clean water. And aggressively pursue the development of renewable and alternative energy. Please, for a bright Arizona future, elect me, Rick Boyer, to Arizona's Corporation Commission. Thank you.

Rick Fowlkes:
Hello. My name is Rick Fowlkes and I'm honored to be the libertarian candidate for Arizona Corporation Commissioner. I believe there's three main reasons people should vote for me in this election. These are qualifications, character and commitment. I'm a consulting engineer. 37-years experience in engineering. I have experience in the electric power industry, the railroad industry and other industries that corporation commission regulates. In addition to my engineering degree I also have a M.B.A. from Arizona State University. I was formerly a vice-president with prominent engineering firms in the Phoenix area and I've been president of my own engineering business in Mesa since 1983. So I feel like I have the right kind of qualifications. I also feel that character is important. I was an eagle scout. I was a cadet at the United States Air Force Academy. My wife Linda Lee and I have been married 39-years. We've raised three children here in Arizona and we have five grandchildren. So I feel like I have the right kind of character for this job. But the most important qualification reason for voting for me is my commitment to libertarian principles. I believe that best government is less government. I believe that small government is preferred over big government. And I believe that less regulation is better than more regulation. If you'd like your vote to send a message that you want more freedom and less government, vote for Rick Fowlkes. If you want to send a message you want to vote for the best qualified candidate vote for Rick Fowlkes. If you want to vote for the candidate with the right kind of character vote for Rick Fowlkes. Please visit our website at www.rfowlkes.com for more information. Send the right message with your vote for corporation commissioner. Vote libertarian. Vote for Rick Fowlkes. Thank you.

Mark Manoil:
Hello. I'm Mark Manoil and I'm asking for your vote for corporation commissioner. The commission makes important decisions that affect all our lives. From the price of electricity to permits for new power plants, those decisions affect not only our daily budgets but the future we create for our children. Over the past 18 months the current commission has raised utility rates by more than 10\% through three rate increases with another 20\% to be determined soon. That means you and I are paying more money for the same power. It's not cleaner or safer; it's just more for the utility company. That is unacceptable. To stop these outrageous increases I need your vote on November 7th. I'm running to restore balance to a commission that only reacts to crises rather than planning wisely for the future. Arizona deserves new energy and fresh ideas on how to tackle the challenges that lie ahead. As your commissioner, I promise you that the basic services regulated by the commission will be reliable, affordable and safe. My family has been in Arizona for five generations and my background in law and business has prepared me well for the many issues that come before the commission. I love this state. I've raised my family here. And I'm dedicated to maintaining the great quality of life we enjoy today but not at the cost of tomorrow. I want to work with our utilities, businesses, government and communities to help Arizona toward a brighter future. One that values and develops our human and natural resources, that invests in our communities, strengthens our economy and leaves us better prepared as we move into the 21st century. This brighter future begins with you. And I'm asking you to vote for me, Mark Manoil for corporation commissioner. Thank you.

Kris Mays:
Hi. I'm Kris Mays, and it's been my honor to be one of your Arizona Corporation Commissioners for the past three years. And I'm here tonight to ask for your vote on November 7. As your commissioner I've led the effort to increase the amount of renewable energy that we produce in the state of Arizona. In fact, this week the corporation commission cast a historic vote on a proposal to increase the amount of renewable energy that our utilities must produce from the current one percent to 15\% by 2025. This historic vote would mean the creation of thousands of new solar rooftops, the first new wind energy production facility in Arizona. And it would put our state back in the forefront of renewable energy generation in America which is exactly where I think we belong. I've also been a leader in the effort to improve our state's energy infrastructure. Last year I flew to Houston, Texas to look the CEO of Kinder Morgan, Richard Kinder, in the eyes and tell him he needed to do a better job of repairing and replacing his aging gasoline pipelines in our state. And I'm proud to report to you that by the end of the year 2007 because of our efforts at the commission all 617-miles of Kinder Morgan pipeline will either be brand-new or 15-years old or younger which is a dramatic improvement over 2003. We're also working hard to bring a new natural gas pipeline to Arizona and natural gas storage for the first time so that we can decrease the price of electricity and natural gas over time. And finally, as utilities come in asking for rate increases, I promise you that I will continue to do what I've been doing for the last three years. And I will ask those utility executives tough questions like why they continue to spend so much money on advertising and sports sponsorships and why they keep paying out million dollar bonuses at a time of rising energy costs. I'm Kris Mays and it's my honor to be here asking for your vote on November 7.

Gary Pierce:
Hello. I'm Gary Pierce. I'm the majority whip in the Arizona House of Representatives and now I want to serve you in the Arizona Corporation Commission. I think that I bring to the arena in a corporation commission leadership, experience, all that in business and government as a teacher and as a parent. I have been very fortunate to have grown up here in Arizona to graduate from Mesa Community College and Arizona State University. I was a teacher here in the valley for three years and then I was in business and managed businesses in rural Arizona. Four years in Sierra Vista and 16-years in Yuma where I was a Honda and Nissan dealer. I was elected county supervisor in Yuma County twice. During that time I was able to serve on other commissions including the Health Commission, the Library District Board of Directors. I served on the Hospital Foundation Board the Salvation Army. I moved back to Mesa in 1998 with my family and in 2001 I was appointed to the Arizona State Legislature where I served as two years as Chairman of Transportation and most recently I have been the majority whip for the Republican caucus. It has been a great pleasure to serve in the legislature and to serve you. I have always kept in mind the things that were important to the entire state not just my district. And that's what you have to do as a corporation commissioner. I think I bring a unique combination of skills to that position. You can count on me and I pledge to be a watchdog for rate payers, to do everything I can to make sure we have consistent power and water coming through our wires and through our pipes. And I pledge to keep those rates as low as they possibly can be. You know, my family means a lot to me and I need to say that I know what it's like to have problems with being able to pay the bills. And I pledge to you that I will help you keep those rates low as I said and do all I can on the commission to make sure that you are represented. Please vote for Gary Pierce November 7 is really a vote for you.

Merry Lucero:
New laws are in effect for next week's election. There are new identification requirements as well as a new law to eliminate long election lines. Get the details from election officials plus analysis of the tightening races. Many are saying this will be an interesting mid-term election. Be an informed voter. Watch Horizon Tuesday at 7:00.

Michael Grant:
And Wednesday we'll take a look at the expansion of the Phoenix Art Museum. Thank you very much for joining us on this Monday evening. I'm Michael Grant. Have a great one. Good night.

Women in Politics


  • The local Democratic and Republican parties aren't the only ones trying to increase political participation among women. Non-partisan organizations are involved as well. Learn about "Running And Winning," sponsored by the Arizona League of Women Voters and the American Association of University Women Arizona, with guests Kathy Schwarz and Beverly Weiss.
Guests:
  • Kathy Schwarz - Arizona League of Women Voters
  • Beverly Weiss - American Association of University Women
Category: Elections

View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on Horizon both major political parties investing time and money to recruit women into the political process. And the Arizona Corporation Commission regulates utilities. We have statements from the five Corporation Commission candidates. That's coming up on Horizon.

Announcer:
Horizon is made possible by contributions from the friends of eight, members of your Arizona PBS Station. Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Good evening. Thanks for joining us tonight on Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. In the news today the Republican nominee for state attorney general Bill Montgomery is going to have to surrender $43,000 of his public campaign funding. That is the settlement approved today by the Citizens Clean Elections Commission. The commission determined that Montgomery should not have used primary election funding to tape a commercial on primary election day and then pay for broadcasting it. Women may constitute more than 50\% of the population but they aren't represented nearly as actively in elective office. Both Democrats and Republicans working to change that. Larry Lemmons takes a look at two programs designed to get women involved.

Larry Lemmons:
Angie Crouse has a political future ahead of her. Lately she's been working on the campaign to send Harry Mitchell to Congress. Mitchell is trying to unseat Incumbent J.D. Hayworth. That's one of three campaigns in which she's involved. She tried to win a seat in the state legislature this year but lost in the Democratic primary.

Angie Crouse:
Yes, it was disappointing. And yes, I will run again to answer the most common questions. However, what I ended up coming away with were some great skills and great abilities. I now have no problem speaking in public. I can do fundraising. I can go talk to a bunch of strangers I can walk into a roomful of people I don't know and start talking to them. These are all great skills. Then I'm also translating a lot of those skills into working on three different campaigns now.

Larry Lemmons:
The political skills she obtained Crouse attributes to her experience with Emerge Arizona.

Dana Kennedy:
We've been in operation over three years now. We have recruited and trained three classes of graduates. 40 women have gone through and graduated through the program. And of those 40 women, we are amazed that we had ten candidates running this year alone.

Larry Lemmons:
Emerge originally began in San Francisco but expanded to Arizona. It's a six-month training program meeting once a month to train Democratic women.

Dana Kennedy:
And we teach them basically campaign skills. We teach them public speaking skills. We teach them how to frame a message. We teach them fundraising. We teach them clean elections. We teach them how to network, how to work a room, all the skills that are necessary if you're going to run for office.

Angie Crouse:
Honestly if it wasn't for Emerge I wouldn't be standing here today.

Larry Lemmons:
Democrats may have a head start in Arizona but Republicans are quickly mobilizing. Tucson's Christine Olson who's visiting the phoenix GOP Headquarters will launch her program originally begun in Pennsylvania in January. The program is called "The Dodie Londen Excellence for Public Service" series.

Christine Olson:
We're announcing the program on January 26. Applications will be due on April 1 and we hope to have our first-class start next fall.

Larry Lemmons:
Speaking here with Gubernatorial Candidate Len Munsil, Olson says interested women should take notice.

Christine Olson:
Well, we have an advisory board. And what we will be doing from today on is going around the state talking about this program and asking people to put names forward of people that might be interested in going through this -- through this school. And then they will apply. And they will be interviewed by our advisory board. And then they were selected. All of the -- basically all of the cost is picked up by our organization. There's a minimal fee of an application fee of about $200. But other than that, there's really no expense to the student.

Larry Lemmons:
The Emerge Arizona program costs $350. In an earlier interview, Crouse talked about her first experience as a candidate.

Angie Crouse:
I was going door to door for several hours in a row on Friday night, Saturday morning, Saturday night, Sunday morning, Sunday night, for 18 hours to talk to voters. And I thought, oh, this is why everyone says it's such hard work. And it is. And being a woman I have an additional talent, and that is for safety reasons I always have to have someone to walk with me. Many of the other challengers that are men that are running, I know that they walk by themselves and they don't even worry about. It so if someone cancels on me it's a quick scramble to find someone else. Another moment was when I was driving down the street even though I helped put up my signs for the first time driving down the streets and seeing them up it was like, wow, I'm really a candidate.

Larry Lemmons:
Win or lose that kind of experience is invaluable. Obviously women are a potent political force. Which is why organizers of both programs say the most valuable aspect of the experience for Democrats and Republicans is that women are getting involved and motivated.

Christine Olson:
Because at the end of the day, when I'm watching the election returns. I'm a nerd. I sit up late and watch all the returns come in. At the end of the day when I get upset it's because I'm worried about what policies are going to be decided in our legislature that are going to affect my kids and then my grandchildren if I'm lucky enough to have them. And I think more and more women are waking up to that. And as we're -- a lot of us have two income families now; healthcare is so important, childcare, education. All issues that resound with women. So that's why it's becoming more and more apparent we need more women in the process.

Meg Burton-Cahill:
I believe our public policy would be different across the country. State level public policy, if there were more women, minorities and working people involved. Involved as elected officials.

Angie Crouse:
We do have sort of an imbalance on the state legislature as well as congress. And since women are a little bit more than half the population, I think that the population should then be represented by true representation. And that is let's try to make it 50/50. Half women, half men. Women also bring a whole different perspective and a whole different view to politics and to the world. And so we need to be able to be there to have a seat at the table.

Michael Grant:
Here with us to talk about getting women involved in the political process is Kathy Schwarz from the Arizona League of Women Voters and Beverly Weiss of American Association of University Women. Both organizations are nonpartisan. Beverly, another way women being encouraged to get involved is the Running and Winning Program? What's that?

Beverly Weiss:
Yes. This is a new program that we're having for the first time in the valley. It's presented by -- jointly with the League of Women Voters and the American Association of University Women. What the program aims to do is to interest young women in the political process and also to think about it in terms of possible careers for themselves. The program is for junior and senior young women in high school.

Michael Grant:
In high school?

Beverly Weiss:
And will be presented this time for the first time in the valley at Coronado high school on November the 15th.

Michael Grant:
Now, Kathy, we tend to think of this in terms of elective office. I suppose -- obviously there are a lot of different positions that can be occupied. Appointive office at high levels as well.

Kathy Schwarz:
Well, that's right. And I think one of the things that we hope the girls learn is they may not want to run for elective office but they certainly can help with other people's campaigns or get involved in other organizations that promote women running for office. You don't have to necessarily run for office yourself to get very involved in helping with campaigns.

Michael Grant:
Beverly, why do you think that women need to be urged more than men?

Beverly Weiss:
Well, I think it has something of perhaps to do with our culture, to begin with, that we tend to look back. You hear a lot about the founding fathers but not so much about founding mothers. [Laughter]

Michael Grant:
Well, that's a good point.

Beverly Weiss:
And so I think in general we have sort of -- we may have tended to feel that way about it in the past. But part of what we're trying to do with running and winning is let the young women see that there are role models right now that they will be able to talk to. We're going to bring elected officials to the high school on November the 15th and the girls are going to be able to interview them and find out about, well, why did you run for office. And what kind of skills do you have to have to run for office.

Michael Grant:
Kathy we were talking before we went on the air here that although Arizona numbers are still not 50/50, Arizona actually has had some relatively impressive statistics from time to time over the past 10, 15 years.

Kathy Schwarz:
We certainly have. And as we stand now I think we rank third in the nation in terms of the number of women represented. And that's primarily at state office level. We have no one in congressional office. But at the state level we're about 33.3\% of the offices are held by women. So that's a pretty good record. We're number three. I think Maryland and Delaware are ahead of us.

Michael Grant:
Now, Beverly, tell us a little bit more about the American Association of University Women.

Beverly Weiss:
The American Association of University Women is the oldest organization that has worked to improve education for women. And it works at all levels. We have branches and members in every state and many, many cities. And we work to bring educational programs and to bring equity into the educational process.

Michael Grant:
You know, I've got a little note here from Larry Lemmons, our producer. There's a story that A.A.U.W. actually gave money to Marie Curie to buy radium?

Beverly Weiss:
Yes. That's actually a historical fact. People like to find these little gems that show how much we were on the ball for a very, very long time.

Michael Grant:
Well, its money well spent. I don't know if anyone has ever told you that before.

Beverly Weiss:
Right. And one of the stories that amuses me about the early times is that two of the women who were involved in founding A.A.U.. Were women who graduated from M.I.T.

Michael Grant:
Oh.

Beverly Weiss:
And considering, you know, that we're talking about the 19th century here, that's a long time ago.

Michael Grant:
Yes. Especially for M.I.T

Beverly Weiss:
Right. One of the women actually was able to complete all of the course work for a PhD. But they refused to give her the PhD. to set a precedent as giving degrees of that magnitude to women.

Michael Grant:
Kathy, obviously League of Women Voters has been around for a long time, too. Going back to what, 1920?

Kathy Schwarz:
1920 right after the passage of the 19th amendment. But the league in spirit goes back a lot further than that, to really to 1848 with the Suffragist Movement, they wrote, they carried banners. The first group to actually demonstrate in front of the white house were members of the Women Suffrage Movement. They were jailed, put in solitary, tortured. So you see they've got a rather earnest history.

Michael Grant:
Sure.

Kathy Schwarz:
And when they finally earned the right to vote the Suffrage Group formed the League of Women Voters. It was hoped very much and I think we succeeded in getting women educated, informed and independent voters.

Michael Grant:
That certainly is my impression that league I think has taken a lot and I think it's a good approach of information about the process can be inspirational in and of itself.

Kathy Schwarz:
Oh, absolutely. And I know as we speak our telephones are ringing off the hooks with people wanting to know where they should vote where they can get voter information. If people can come and talk about the propositions. So we're still doing a good job of educating people for their informed voters.

Michael Grant:
Okay. Kathy Schwarz thank you very much for joining us. Beverly Weiss our thanks to you as well.

Michael Grant:
The five members of the Arizona Corporation Commission oversee some very vital services in our state. They watch over the cost of electricity and natural gas, also the safety of pipelines that bring us gas and oil. The commission's policies determine the rates you pay for telecommunications and water. The panel also oversees corporations, securities and railroad safety. Some have described the corporation commission as the fourth branch of government because of its wide-reaching jurisdiction. On November 7, voters are going to see the names of five people seeking seats on the commission. The two top vote getters win. Horizon gave the candidates an opportunity to ask you for your vote.

Richard Boyer:
Hello. I'm Rick Boyer and I'm asking for your vote to elect me to Arizona's Corporation Commission. My experience as an Arizona judge, three-term state senator and an attorney have prepared me well for the challenges facing the Corporation Commission in our great state. As a veteran I will fight for you against the rate shock of higher utility rates. Ensure that Arizonans have affordable and adequate energy and clean water. And aggressively pursue the development of renewable and alternative energy. Please, for a bright Arizona future, elect me, Rick Boyer, to Arizona's Corporation Commission. Thank you.

Rick Fowlkes:
Hello. My name is Rick Fowlkes and I'm honored to be the libertarian candidate for Arizona Corporation Commissioner. I believe there's three main reasons people should vote for me in this election. These are qualifications, character and commitment. I'm a consulting engineer. 37-years experience in engineering. I have experience in the electric power industry, the railroad industry and other industries that corporation commission regulates. In addition to my engineering degree I also have a M.B.A. from Arizona State University. I was formerly a vice-president with prominent engineering firms in the Phoenix area and I've been president of my own engineering business in Mesa since 1983. So I feel like I have the right kind of qualifications. I also feel that character is important. I was an eagle scout. I was a cadet at the United States Air Force Academy. My wife Linda Lee and I have been married 39-years. We've raised three children here in Arizona and we have five grandchildren. So I feel like I have the right kind of character for this job. But the most important qualification reason for voting for me is my commitment to libertarian principles. I believe that best government is less government. I believe that small government is preferred over big government. And I believe that less regulation is better than more regulation. If you'd like your vote to send a message that you want more freedom and less government, vote for Rick Fowlkes. If you want to send a message you want to vote for the best qualified candidate vote for Rick Fowlkes. If you want to vote for the candidate with the right kind of character vote for Rick Fowlkes. Please visit our website at www.rfowlkes.com for more information. Send the right message with your vote for corporation commissioner. Vote libertarian. Vote for Rick Fowlkes. Thank you.

Mark Manoil:
Hello. I'm Mark Manoil and I'm asking for your vote for corporation commissioner. The commission makes important decisions that affect all our lives. From the price of electricity to permits for new power plants, those decisions affect not only our daily budgets but the future we create for our children. Over the past 18 months the current commission has raised utility rates by more than 10\% through three rate increases with another 20\% to be determined soon. That means you and I are paying more money for the same power. It's not cleaner or safer; it's just more for the utility company. That is unacceptable. To stop these outrageous increases I need your vote on November 7th. I'm running to restore balance to a commission that only reacts to crises rather than planning wisely for the future. Arizona deserves new energy and fresh ideas on how to tackle the challenges that lie ahead. As your commissioner, I promise you that the basic services regulated by the commission will be reliable, affordable and safe. My family has been in Arizona for five generations and my background in law and business has prepared me well for the many issues that come before the commission. I love this state. I've raised my family here. And I'm dedicated to maintaining the great quality of life we enjoy today but not at the cost of tomorrow. I want to work with our utilities, businesses, government and communities to help Arizona toward a brighter future. One that values and develops our human and natural resources, that invests in our communities, strengthens our economy and leaves us better prepared as we move into the 21st century. This brighter future begins with you. And I'm asking you to vote for me, Mark Manoil for corporation commissioner. Thank you.

Kris Mays:
Hi. I'm Kris Mays, and it's been my honor to be one of your Arizona Corporation Commissioners for the past three years. And I'm here tonight to ask for your vote on November 7. As your commissioner I've led the effort to increase the amount of renewable energy that we produce in the state of Arizona. In fact, this week the corporation commission cast a historic vote on a proposal to increase the amount of renewable energy that our utilities must produce from the current one percent to 15\% by 2025. This historic vote would mean the creation of thousands of new solar rooftops, the first new wind energy production facility in Arizona. And it would put our state back in the forefront of renewable energy generation in America which is exactly where I think we belong. I've also been a leader in the effort to improve our state's energy infrastructure. Last year I flew to Houston, Texas to look the CEO of Kinder Morgan, Richard Kinder, in the eyes and tell him he needed to do a better job of repairing and replacing his aging gasoline pipelines in our state. And I'm proud to report to you that by the end of the year 2007 because of our efforts at the commission all 617-miles of Kinder Morgan pipeline will either be brand-new or 15-years old or younger which is a dramatic improvement over 2003. We're also working hard to bring a new natural gas pipeline to Arizona and natural gas storage for the first time so that we can decrease the price of electricity and natural gas over time. And finally, as utilities come in asking for rate increases, I promise you that I will continue to do what I've been doing for the last three years. And I will ask those utility executives tough questions like why they continue to spend so much money on advertising and sports sponsorships and why they keep paying out million dollar bonuses at a time of rising energy costs. I'm Kris Mays and it's my honor to be here asking for your vote on November 7.

Gary Pierce:
Hello. I'm Gary Pierce. I'm the majority whip in the Arizona House of Representatives and now I want to serve you in the Arizona Corporation Commission. I think that I bring to the arena in a corporation commission leadership, experience, all that in business and government as a teacher and as a parent. I have been very fortunate to have grown up here in Arizona to graduate from Mesa Community College and Arizona State University. I was a teacher here in the valley for three years and then I was in business and managed businesses in rural Arizona. Four years in Sierra Vista and 16-years in Yuma where I was a Honda and Nissan dealer. I was elected county supervisor in Yuma County twice. During that time I was able to serve on other commissions including the Health Commission, the Library District Board of Directors. I served on the Hospital Foundation Board the Salvation Army. I moved back to Mesa in 1998 with my family and in 2001 I was appointed to the Arizona State Legislature where I served as two years as Chairman of Transportation and most recently I have been the majority whip for the Republican caucus. It has been a great pleasure to serve in the legislature and to serve you. I have always kept in mind the things that were important to the entire state not just my district. And that's what you have to do as a corporation commissioner. I think I bring a unique combination of skills to that position. You can count on me and I pledge to be a watchdog for rate payers, to do everything I can to make sure we have consistent power and water coming through our wires and through our pipes. And I pledge to keep those rates as low as they possibly can be. You know, my family means a lot to me and I need to say that I know what it's like to have problems with being able to pay the bills. And I pledge to you that I will help you keep those rates low as I said and do all I can on the commission to make sure that you are represented. Please vote for Gary Pierce November 7 is really a vote for you.

Merry Lucero:
New laws are in effect for next week's election. There are new identification requirements as well as a new law to eliminate long election lines. Get the details from election officials plus analysis of the tightening races. Many are saying this will be an interesting mid-term election. Be an informed voter. Watch Horizon Tuesday at 7:00.

Michael Grant:
And Wednesday we'll take a look at the expansion of the Phoenix Art Museum. Thank you very much for joining us on this Monday evening. I'm Michael Grant. Have a great one. Good night.

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