Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

August 2, 2006


Host: Michael Grant

ASU College of Design new entrepreneurial


  • An ASU program at the College of Design offers students an opportunity to create solutions to real problems for people.
Guests:
  • Jack Harris - Phoenix Police Chief
  • Mark Shore - President and chief executive officer, Valley of the Sun Jewish Community Center
Category: Education

View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on Horizon, Phoenix police continue to hunt for the men who have terrorized the valley for months. And with the recent death of a Mesa woman, authorities are beefing up security and asking all residents, English and non-English speakers alike, to stay alert and assist with their capture. Tonight we get an update from City of Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris. Then, thousands of young athletes will soon arrive in the valley for one of the largest teen Olympics in the world. The Maccabi Games will be held in Arizona and we'll talk with the event chair about the program and the economic impact for the state. And an ASU program at the College of Design that offers students an opportunity to create solutions to real problems for people. That's all next on Horizon.


Michael Grant:
Good evening, welcome to Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. Phoenix Police say they have a better description of the man linked to numerous murders, rapes and robberies in the valley. Authorities believe the man known as the ‘baseline killer', is dark skinned, between the ages of 25 and 30, about five-foot ten-inches tall and 170 pounds with a thin medium build. The ‘baseline killer' has been linked to crimes in the valley since August of 2005 when it's believed he first assaulted two teenage girls. Since his rampage he's thought to have terrorized 40 people...eight of them killed. Police say he searches for victims who are alone in the late evening hours. The reward for any information leading to the capture of the ‘baseline killer' and the ‘serial shooter' has increased to 100-thousand dollars each. The Phoenix police have held several community meetings to inform the public about updates and to encourage residents to assist in his capture. Here to talk about this and the case of the serial shooter is Phoenix police Chief Jack Harris.

Michael Grant:
Chief, thanks for being here.

Chief Jack Harris: You're welcome.

Michael Grant: You had a significant break through with the more detailed description that I just read?

Chief Jack Harris: I don't know if it would be considered a significant break through, but any information that we can get that more clearly defines what the suspect looks like is certainly of benefit to us and to the community.

Michael Grant: How critical was it finally linking forensically the death of the two women in February, I believe it was, over what, lower Baseline, 93rd avenue to this case? I know it filled in at least a time gap.

Chief Jack Harris: It did provide us with some information that was different than what we were seeing in the pattern. We were looking at a pattern of about every 30 days that this person would strike. And for some reason we saw that there was a gap there. That he didn't strike. So it was significant that we were able to tie that forensically to the other shootings and realize that there really wasn't a gap, it was still about the same as what it had been previously.

Michael Grant:
There was hope, I know, when that development occurred that just given the time of day, the traffic in that area, that kind of thing that there might have been perhaps more or better witnesses around the scene of those two shootings. Does that remain the hope?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes. That has been one of the problems with both of these serial criminals that we've been tracking is that we've had a very difficult time getting any information from any witnesses that can give us any kind of definitive information on the type of car, suspect, et cetera. So certainly anytime that there's a possibility of more witnesses, that's going to benefit us.

Michael Grant:
Because I seem to recall that was in the early morning hours. Well, they were getting ready for like a breakfast shift where people would start work and that kind of thing, operating one of those lunch wagons or breakfast wagons.

Chief Jack Harris:
That's right.

Michael Grant:
You're having the community meeting at Creighton School on East McDowell tonight?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes.

Michael Grant:
What's going to be covered there?

Chief Jack Harris:
We're going to attempt again to give community members an overview of what has happened, and again asking for their support and for their help. We still firmly believe that someone in the community, someone in the valley, knows information that will lead us to the people responsible for these crimes. So we're attempting to go out again tonight into the community. And in this case the Hispanic community, the Spanish-speaking community, that predominantly lives in the area where the serial rapist has been hitting. And ask them for assistance to come forward to us.

Michael Grant:
Also giving them the message that you can come forward with information and not fear that we're acting as agents for immigration and naturalization?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes, absolutely. The fear that we run into in the Hispanic community, especially one that may be more heavily populated with immigrants from another country that may not be documented and here's the police walking up asking you to come and talk to us. And they have a fear that if they do so they're going to be arrested and deported. And they should certainly not feel that way tonight. We are there to help them by giving them the description, the information that we've got as much as we can to help them to remain safe in their own neighborhood. And what to be on the lookout for. But also to help us, because they may know something but they're afraid to come forward with the information or they haven't heard it in their own language.

Michael Grant:
Well, Phoenix police Chief Jack Harris, thanks very much for joining us. Obviously our fingers are crossed for the police department and the entire community that we track these two people down.

Chief Jack Harris:
Thank you.

Michael Grant:
It's known as one of the largest team sports competitions in the world. The JCC Maccabi games beginning this weekend with an opening day ceremony held on Sunday at the U.S. Airways Center. During the week long event teams will compete in track, swim, dance, baseball among many other sports. Cities throughout the world host the games every year. Phoenix is one of this year's host cities. Here's a glimpse as what the city can expect.

Announcer:
This is a once in a lifetime experience where Jewish teenagers take part in the competition hanging out with Jewish teens from around the world, participating in community service projects and dancing the night away in evening activities. That's a week of faith, fun and friendship. It's a thrill that can only be the JCC Maccabi games. The JCC Maccabi games begin when thousands of athletes, coaches, families, community leaders and volunteers from around the world arrive in the host city. Wherever you look you see Maccabi signs, Maccabi shirts, Maccabi bags as well as Maccabi athletes. Maccabi is everywhere.

Announcer:
Every one in the community is eager to meet the athletes, especially host families. The host family program is a unique feature of the JCC Maccabi games. Athletes are housed by local community families and quickly become much more than visitors.

Announcer:
A defining moment for athletes competing in the games is the parade into the stadium with their teams during opening ceremonies.

Announcer:
During the ceremony there is a tribute to the 11 Israeli athletes murdered at the 1972 Olympics in Munich. This memorial has become an important Maccabi tradition. The culminating moment of the opening ceremonies comes when the Maccabi flame enters the arena. The crowd explodes with excitement when the caldron which will burn the entire week of the game is finally lit.

Announcer:
The strive for athletic excellence is at the center of the JCC Maccabi games. Athletes compete for medals in 14 different sports. The competition is intense. And some athletes have practiced the entire year in preparation for the games. Many a future award-winning athlete began his or her career with Maccabi. Before swimmer Lenny Krayzelberg won gold at the 2000 summer Olympic Games he had won gold for team Los Angeles at the JCC Maccabi games. But sports are just a portion of what the JCC Maccabi games are about. Meaningful Jewish programs experienced at hang time with Israeli Shlichim help the athletes strengthen their Jewish identity. Another essential element of the games is a program called day of caring, day of sharing, which sends athletes throughout the host city to participate in various volunteer projects. The day of caring is a unique program that gives teens a hands-on example of preparing the work.

Softball Coach:
It takes the outside pitch to right field.

Basketball Coach:
Relax. Have fun.

Male Athlete:
Dreams come true.

Female Athlete:
I've had the greatest time and met so many people.

Male Athlete:
It's a big adrenaline rush.

Male Athlete:
I've never done anything like this before. I'm really excited.

Female Athlete:
I didn't know there were so many Jewish people in America.

Announcer:
The JCC Maccabi games have seen past participants return to become coaches, host families or delegates themselves. In this way the JCC Maccabi tradition is passed on to new participants. The JCC Maccabi games are much more than athletics, much more than competition. The games are the people whose lives are touched.

Michael Grant:
Joining us tonight to talk about the upcoming Phoenix Maccabi games is Mark Shore. He is the president and chief executive officer of the valley of the sun Jewish Community Center. Mark, this is neat.

Mark Shore:
Great stuff.

Michael Grant:
Yes.

Michael Grant: I guess I've been living under a rock. This is the first I ever heard of it. Is this the first time Phoenix has been a venue for it?

Mark Shore: Correct. The JCC Maccabi games actually began 24 years ago in Memphis, Tennessee. We put in a bid about two years ago to bring it to the valley. We had to fill out lots and lots of forms, make some Guarantees and here we are. The games begin this Sunday.

Michael Grant:
Now, there's a New Orleans tie to this, correct?

Mark Shore:
Correct. Originally the New Orleans Jewish community center was scheduled to run the games this week. However, Hurricane Katrina came. And we now became the first week and New Orleans delegation will be coming here.

Michael Grant:
Are there qualifying roundtables to get here?

Mark Shore:
Well, each of the athletes are really connected to their own local community in roughly 6 to 8 months before the games begin each community has tryouts. And the children will try out for baseball, softball, soccer, table tennis, swimming, basketball. And all in all about 14 sports that the youth can try out for. And once they're chosen they represent their community at the North American games.

Michael Grant:
Now, this was imported from Israel, right? It's been going on in Israel for a longer time.

Mark Shore:
Right. And they have the Maccabi and games or as they call them the Maccabiate. And we wanted to create something in North America that can help youth connect. Not only youth but parents. Each of the athletes is going to be helped by local families. And throughout the week they have the opportunity to connect, make friends from all over the world.

Michael Grant:
Now, the games are not just about athletics, correct?


Mark Shore:
Certainly not. The real message to the games is athletics and physical fitness is important, friendly competition is important. We will have gold medals, silver and bronze medals. But what's more important to us is when the child leaves at the end of the games that they have made new friends from all over the world.

Michael Grant:
I'm sure being housed with local people as opposed to in hotels I'm sure that fosters that as well.

Mark Shore:
And I think the spirit of the games fosters that. On Monday night we have host family night and each of these families will be not only having meals with the children but also doing something exciting like come to a Diamondbacks game or visit other valley sights. The host families actually -- and during the week of the games we see many of the host families if not all who come to the competitions and cheer for their athlete.

Michael Grant:
Tell us a little bit more about the Jewish Community Council.

Mark Shore:
The Jewish Community Center has been in business here in the valley since 1945. We are a community-serving agency that serves everyone regardless of religion or background. We have a whole host of programs from daycare, preschool, all the way through and including programs for seniors. Lots of programs in the fitness world as well as in the arts and cultural arts connections. We have lots of activities, school holiday programs. We have a very, very successful day camp-- that serves about a thousand different children throughout the summer. A very melting pot and everyone gets involved.

Michael Grant:
Well, and you guys got to feel pretty good about being one of the -- it's one of three venues, right?

Mark Shore:
Correct. This year there is three. We have the first week. The week after us you have the games in Stamford, Connecticut and Vancouver, British Columbia.

Michael Grant:
Mark Shore, thank you very much for joining us. Cool deal. Thanks for talking about it.

Mark Shore:
Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Development of a new product is a complex undertaking that involves elements of engineering design and business at the ASU College of Design. The university's ace program provides students with each of those disciplines. The program also creates for its participants a unique entrepreneurial atmosphere that promotes positive social change.

Announcer:
A firefighter's equipment can mean the difference between life and death. But sometimes the design of that equipment can make a dangerous situation even more so. At ASU's college of design, that is just the sort of real-world challenge that students are learning to tackle.

Pradad Boradkar:
This is a transdisciplinary research and education lab where we bring together students and faculty to work on new product development and new product design, which is socially and environmentally responsible. The program involves senior level students in industrial design, graphic design, business and engineering who work on their senior year capstone projects on a thesis. And what the students do is come up with ideas for new products that solve real problems for real people.

Spencer Dodge:
Not only is it a place where different majors get together but it's a laboratory where we grow together, we learn together. We learn things about the real world. How to truly create a product from conceptualization all the way to building a prototype in the most functional working phase that we possibly can. It's as close to reality within the university environment as you can get.

Announcer:
The innovation space program was founded in 2004 by the late Paul Rothstein, an associate professor of industrial design who created a unique approach to design and development called integrated innovation.

Pradad Boradkar:
When the students are given the assignment to come up with new product ideas they ask four key questions. They ask, are these ideas desirable for people? So we think of user-centered product design and development. Will they benefit society and the environment? So is it good for society? The third question they ask is, will it bring value to business? So does it make economic sense to do this? And the fourth is, is it possible to engineer it. And unless we have a decent answer to those four questions we think it's not true innovation. And that's what sets us apart from the rest of the people doing similar stuff.

Announcer:
The student teams begin the actual design process with extensive research in areas such as consumer needs, market trends and available technology. In addition to interacting with potential users.

Pradad Boradkar:
So we start with research, analyze that information, then step into brainstorming. How can we come up with product ideas? What opportunities exist out in the world that we can then transform into good product designs? Then we go into the process of trying out some of their designs, testing them, evaluating them, coming up with esthetic solutions and ergonomic solutions and ideas that would really make a difference.

Announcer:
The teams translate their ideas into detailed sketches and models and ultimately new business venture proposals.

Pradad Boradkar:
Each proposal includes a product design idea, a brand strategy and communication strategy, an engineering feasibility assessment and a business and marketing plan. Then it becomes the intellectual property that students generate in the class.

Announcer:
One of the most critical elements of the innovation space program is an involvement of a variety of partners or sponsors in the process of new design and product development. One such collaboration involves the Phoenix fire department and efforts to create a new generation of self--contained breathing apparatus or SCBA.

Kurt Hinkle:
These are air packs that can enable firefighters to go into toxic environments to perform rescue work. One of the problems with the current configuration of SCBA design is they are big and bulky and the firefighters have lost their lives by becoming trapped and entangled during firefighting efforts. One of the concepts we're working on that ASU would be to streamline that design so that it would be safer for firefighters.

Announcer:
Another product design collaboration with the fire department involves thermal imaging technology.

Kurt Hinkle:
Firefighters use thermal imaging cameras. And these are somewhat bulky hand-held cameras that allow firefighters to see through smoke, to peer through dark areas to look for potential victims in the event of a rescue. With the development of the digital display technology we might be able to incorporate a smaller camera into a firefighter's helmet and perhaps have a digital display in the face shield for the mask allowing both hands to be free.

Announcer:
The technology that would make such a display possible involves an additional collaborative effort with the ASU flexible display center.

Greg Raupp:
I'm a technologist. I know pathway of process, I know the technology hurdles that need to be overcome to get to the point where I can make a flexible display. But I'm not a product designer. The innovation space, on the other hand, is a very creative way to get students engaged in the design process. The design process creates exciting new products, products that might actually end up out there in the real world. And that's why we're working together.

Announcer:
Innovation space students also have worked with ASU center for cognitive ubiquitous computing. The center is engaged in research that focuses on helping those who are visually impaired perform an assortment of every tasks, with the ease of sighted individuals.

Sethuraman Panchanathan:
We heard of the innovation space and we thought, wow, this would be a great collaboration to woman with them to help us take our research and preliminary prototypes into interesting product designs that we can help the population, in this case for the blind who want to have a reading device.

Announcer:
Cubix eye care reader is a device created to read documents to vision-impaired workers.

Sethuranman Panchanathan:
What we have is a desktop device which allows you to read books where a camera picks up the image of the book and an optical character recognition software reads the book in terms of its content. So we are currently in the first stage of the prototype development where the innovation space people have helped us.

Announcer:
The innovation space program is committed to the idea that design is a process that can solve problems and improve society. And that the best way to accomplish that is to provide future product designers for the most comprehensive array of skills possible.

Pradad Boradkar:
Often designers are seen as people who only provide an extent of skin to the products, that they do a cosmetic job, provide esthetic treatment and that's about. It and that does happen in the design work. However, what we try to do here is to inform students and to make them realize that the products that they design go out into the world and can have significant impact. Because when we design things they're manufactured in thousands, hundreds of thousands and maybe millions. So they have a significant impact on society and the environment. So we in innovation space try to equip students with the tools that they need to be good designers, to be responsible citizens and to be critical about the work that they do.

Michael Grant:
If you'd like a transcript of tonight's show, information on future topics, log on to the website at azpbs.org. Click on Horizon. Now a look at what's on tomorrow.

Nadine Arroyo:
Peter Likins, the man who led the University of Arizona for nearly ten years talks about he's tenure and plans for the future. And former Mexican cabinet member Juan Hernandez discusses his latest book on the illegal immigration crisis. That's on Horizon, Thursday at 7, here on 8.

Michael Grant:
After Horizon please stay tuned for Horizonte. Take a look at a new initiative by the Partnership for a Drug Free America. It targets teens use of prescription and over the counter drugs. That information on Horizonte, Thursday at 7:30 right after Horizon. Thank you very much for joining us on this Wednesday evening. I'm Michael Grant. Hope you have a great night. Good night.

Maccabi Games


  • On August 6 athletes from around the world will compete in the annual Jewish Olympics known as the Maccabi Games right here in the Valley. Mark Shore, president and CEO of the Valley of the Sun Jewish Community Center, will join Michael Grant to talk about the games’ impact on Arizona's economy.
Guests:
  • Jack Harris - Phoenix Police Chief
  • Mark Shore - President and chief executive officer, Valley of the Sun Jewish Community Center


View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on Horizon, Phoenix police continue to hunt for the men who have terrorized the valley for months. And with the recent death of a Mesa woman, authorities are beefing up security and asking all residents, English and non-English speakers alike, to stay alert and assist with their capture. Tonight we get an update from City of Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris. Then, thousands of young athletes will soon arrive in the valley for one of the largest teen Olympics in the world. The Maccabi Games will be held in Arizona and we'll talk with the event chair about the program and the economic impact for the state. And an ASU program at the College of Design that offers students an opportunity to create solutions to real problems for people. That's all next on Horizon.


Michael Grant:
Good evening, welcome to Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. Phoenix Police say they have a better description of the man linked to numerous murders, rapes and robberies in the valley. Authorities believe the man known as the ‘baseline killer', is dark skinned, between the ages of 25 and 30, about five-foot ten-inches tall and 170 pounds with a thin medium build. The ‘baseline killer' has been linked to crimes in the valley since August of 2005 when it's believed he first assaulted two teenage girls. Since his rampage he's thought to have terrorized 40 people...eight of them killed. Police say he searches for victims who are alone in the late evening hours. The reward for any information leading to the capture of the ‘baseline killer' and the ‘serial shooter' has increased to 100-thousand dollars each. The Phoenix police have held several community meetings to inform the public about updates and to encourage residents to assist in his capture. Here to talk about this and the case of the serial shooter is Phoenix police Chief Jack Harris.

Michael Grant:
Chief, thanks for being here.

Chief Jack Harris: You're welcome.

Michael Grant: You had a significant break through with the more detailed description that I just read?

Chief Jack Harris: I don't know if it would be considered a significant break through, but any information that we can get that more clearly defines what the suspect looks like is certainly of benefit to us and to the community.

Michael Grant: How critical was it finally linking forensically the death of the two women in February, I believe it was, over what, lower Baseline, 93rd avenue to this case? I know it filled in at least a time gap.

Chief Jack Harris: It did provide us with some information that was different than what we were seeing in the pattern. We were looking at a pattern of about every 30 days that this person would strike. And for some reason we saw that there was a gap there. That he didn't strike. So it was significant that we were able to tie that forensically to the other shootings and realize that there really wasn't a gap, it was still about the same as what it had been previously.

Michael Grant:
There was hope, I know, when that development occurred that just given the time of day, the traffic in that area, that kind of thing that there might have been perhaps more or better witnesses around the scene of those two shootings. Does that remain the hope?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes. That has been one of the problems with both of these serial criminals that we've been tracking is that we've had a very difficult time getting any information from any witnesses that can give us any kind of definitive information on the type of car, suspect, et cetera. So certainly anytime that there's a possibility of more witnesses, that's going to benefit us.

Michael Grant:
Because I seem to recall that was in the early morning hours. Well, they were getting ready for like a breakfast shift where people would start work and that kind of thing, operating one of those lunch wagons or breakfast wagons.

Chief Jack Harris:
That's right.

Michael Grant:
You're having the community meeting at Creighton School on East McDowell tonight?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes.

Michael Grant:
What's going to be covered there?

Chief Jack Harris:
We're going to attempt again to give community members an overview of what has happened, and again asking for their support and for their help. We still firmly believe that someone in the community, someone in the valley, knows information that will lead us to the people responsible for these crimes. So we're attempting to go out again tonight into the community. And in this case the Hispanic community, the Spanish-speaking community, that predominantly lives in the area where the serial rapist has been hitting. And ask them for assistance to come forward to us.

Michael Grant:
Also giving them the message that you can come forward with information and not fear that we're acting as agents for immigration and naturalization?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes, absolutely. The fear that we run into in the Hispanic community, especially one that may be more heavily populated with immigrants from another country that may not be documented and here's the police walking up asking you to come and talk to us. And they have a fear that if they do so they're going to be arrested and deported. And they should certainly not feel that way tonight. We are there to help them by giving them the description, the information that we've got as much as we can to help them to remain safe in their own neighborhood. And what to be on the lookout for. But also to help us, because they may know something but they're afraid to come forward with the information or they haven't heard it in their own language.

Michael Grant:
Well, Phoenix police Chief Jack Harris, thanks very much for joining us. Obviously our fingers are crossed for the police department and the entire community that we track these two people down.

Chief Jack Harris:
Thank you.

Michael Grant:
It's known as one of the largest team sports competitions in the world. The JCC Maccabi games beginning this weekend with an opening day ceremony held on Sunday at the U.S. Airways Center. During the week long event teams will compete in track, swim, dance, baseball among many other sports. Cities throughout the world host the games every year. Phoenix is one of this year's host cities. Here's a glimpse as what the city can expect.

Announcer:
This is a once in a lifetime experience where Jewish teenagers take part in the competition hanging out with Jewish teens from around the world, participating in community service projects and dancing the night away in evening activities. That's a week of faith, fun and friendship. It's a thrill that can only be the JCC Maccabi games. The JCC Maccabi games begin when thousands of athletes, coaches, families, community leaders and volunteers from around the world arrive in the host city. Wherever you look you see Maccabi signs, Maccabi shirts, Maccabi bags as well as Maccabi athletes. Maccabi is everywhere.

Announcer:
Every one in the community is eager to meet the athletes, especially host families. The host family program is a unique feature of the JCC Maccabi games. Athletes are housed by local community families and quickly become much more than visitors.

Announcer:
A defining moment for athletes competing in the games is the parade into the stadium with their teams during opening ceremonies.

Announcer:
During the ceremony there is a tribute to the 11 Israeli athletes murdered at the 1972 Olympics in Munich. This memorial has become an important Maccabi tradition. The culminating moment of the opening ceremonies comes when the Maccabi flame enters the arena. The crowd explodes with excitement when the caldron which will burn the entire week of the game is finally lit.

Announcer:
The strive for athletic excellence is at the center of the JCC Maccabi games. Athletes compete for medals in 14 different sports. The competition is intense. And some athletes have practiced the entire year in preparation for the games. Many a future award-winning athlete began his or her career with Maccabi. Before swimmer Lenny Krayzelberg won gold at the 2000 summer Olympic Games he had won gold for team Los Angeles at the JCC Maccabi games. But sports are just a portion of what the JCC Maccabi games are about. Meaningful Jewish programs experienced at hang time with Israeli Shlichim help the athletes strengthen their Jewish identity. Another essential element of the games is a program called day of caring, day of sharing, which sends athletes throughout the host city to participate in various volunteer projects. The day of caring is a unique program that gives teens a hands-on example of preparing the work.

Softball Coach:
It takes the outside pitch to right field.

Basketball Coach:
Relax. Have fun.

Male Athlete:
Dreams come true.

Female Athlete:
I've had the greatest time and met so many people.

Male Athlete:
It's a big adrenaline rush.

Male Athlete:
I've never done anything like this before. I'm really excited.

Female Athlete:
I didn't know there were so many Jewish people in America.

Announcer:
The JCC Maccabi games have seen past participants return to become coaches, host families or delegates themselves. In this way the JCC Maccabi tradition is passed on to new participants. The JCC Maccabi games are much more than athletics, much more than competition. The games are the people whose lives are touched.

Michael Grant:
Joining us tonight to talk about the upcoming Phoenix Maccabi games is Mark Shore. He is the president and chief executive officer of the valley of the sun Jewish Community Center. Mark, this is neat.

Mark Shore:
Great stuff.

Michael Grant:
Yes.

Michael Grant: I guess I've been living under a rock. This is the first I ever heard of it. Is this the first time Phoenix has been a venue for it?

Mark Shore: Correct. The JCC Maccabi games actually began 24 years ago in Memphis, Tennessee. We put in a bid about two years ago to bring it to the valley. We had to fill out lots and lots of forms, make some Guarantees and here we are. The games begin this Sunday.

Michael Grant:
Now, there's a New Orleans tie to this, correct?

Mark Shore:
Correct. Originally the New Orleans Jewish community center was scheduled to run the games this week. However, Hurricane Katrina came. And we now became the first week and New Orleans delegation will be coming here.

Michael Grant:
Are there qualifying roundtables to get here?

Mark Shore:
Well, each of the athletes are really connected to their own local community in roughly 6 to 8 months before the games begin each community has tryouts. And the children will try out for baseball, softball, soccer, table tennis, swimming, basketball. And all in all about 14 sports that the youth can try out for. And once they're chosen they represent their community at the North American games.

Michael Grant:
Now, this was imported from Israel, right? It's been going on in Israel for a longer time.

Mark Shore:
Right. And they have the Maccabi and games or as they call them the Maccabiate. And we wanted to create something in North America that can help youth connect. Not only youth but parents. Each of the athletes is going to be helped by local families. And throughout the week they have the opportunity to connect, make friends from all over the world.

Michael Grant:
Now, the games are not just about athletics, correct?


Mark Shore:
Certainly not. The real message to the games is athletics and physical fitness is important, friendly competition is important. We will have gold medals, silver and bronze medals. But what's more important to us is when the child leaves at the end of the games that they have made new friends from all over the world.

Michael Grant:
I'm sure being housed with local people as opposed to in hotels I'm sure that fosters that as well.

Mark Shore:
And I think the spirit of the games fosters that. On Monday night we have host family night and each of these families will be not only having meals with the children but also doing something exciting like come to a Diamondbacks game or visit other valley sights. The host families actually -- and during the week of the games we see many of the host families if not all who come to the competitions and cheer for their athlete.

Michael Grant:
Tell us a little bit more about the Jewish Community Council.

Mark Shore:
The Jewish Community Center has been in business here in the valley since 1945. We are a community-serving agency that serves everyone regardless of religion or background. We have a whole host of programs from daycare, preschool, all the way through and including programs for seniors. Lots of programs in the fitness world as well as in the arts and cultural arts connections. We have lots of activities, school holiday programs. We have a very, very successful day camp-- that serves about a thousand different children throughout the summer. A very melting pot and everyone gets involved.

Michael Grant:
Well, and you guys got to feel pretty good about being one of the -- it's one of three venues, right?

Mark Shore:
Correct. This year there is three. We have the first week. The week after us you have the games in Stamford, Connecticut and Vancouver, British Columbia.

Michael Grant:
Mark Shore, thank you very much for joining us. Cool deal. Thanks for talking about it.

Mark Shore:
Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Development of a new product is a complex undertaking that involves elements of engineering design and business at the ASU College of Design. The university's ace program provides students with each of those disciplines. The program also creates for its participants a unique entrepreneurial atmosphere that promotes positive social change.

Announcer:
A firefighter's equipment can mean the difference between life and death. But sometimes the design of that equipment can make a dangerous situation even more so. At ASU's college of design, that is just the sort of real-world challenge that students are learning to tackle.

Pradad Boradkar:
This is a transdisciplinary research and education lab where we bring together students and faculty to work on new product development and new product design, which is socially and environmentally responsible. The program involves senior level students in industrial design, graphic design, business and engineering who work on their senior year capstone projects on a thesis. And what the students do is come up with ideas for new products that solve real problems for real people.

Spencer Dodge:
Not only is it a place where different majors get together but it's a laboratory where we grow together, we learn together. We learn things about the real world. How to truly create a product from conceptualization all the way to building a prototype in the most functional working phase that we possibly can. It's as close to reality within the university environment as you can get.

Announcer:
The innovation space program was founded in 2004 by the late Paul Rothstein, an associate professor of industrial design who created a unique approach to design and development called integrated innovation.

Pradad Boradkar:
When the students are given the assignment to come up with new product ideas they ask four key questions. They ask, are these ideas desirable for people? So we think of user-centered product design and development. Will they benefit society and the environment? So is it good for society? The third question they ask is, will it bring value to business? So does it make economic sense to do this? And the fourth is, is it possible to engineer it. And unless we have a decent answer to those four questions we think it's not true innovation. And that's what sets us apart from the rest of the people doing similar stuff.

Announcer:
The student teams begin the actual design process with extensive research in areas such as consumer needs, market trends and available technology. In addition to interacting with potential users.

Pradad Boradkar:
So we start with research, analyze that information, then step into brainstorming. How can we come up with product ideas? What opportunities exist out in the world that we can then transform into good product designs? Then we go into the process of trying out some of their designs, testing them, evaluating them, coming up with esthetic solutions and ergonomic solutions and ideas that would really make a difference.

Announcer:
The teams translate their ideas into detailed sketches and models and ultimately new business venture proposals.

Pradad Boradkar:
Each proposal includes a product design idea, a brand strategy and communication strategy, an engineering feasibility assessment and a business and marketing plan. Then it becomes the intellectual property that students generate in the class.

Announcer:
One of the most critical elements of the innovation space program is an involvement of a variety of partners or sponsors in the process of new design and product development. One such collaboration involves the Phoenix fire department and efforts to create a new generation of self--contained breathing apparatus or SCBA.

Kurt Hinkle:
These are air packs that can enable firefighters to go into toxic environments to perform rescue work. One of the problems with the current configuration of SCBA design is they are big and bulky and the firefighters have lost their lives by becoming trapped and entangled during firefighting efforts. One of the concepts we're working on that ASU would be to streamline that design so that it would be safer for firefighters.

Announcer:
Another product design collaboration with the fire department involves thermal imaging technology.

Kurt Hinkle:
Firefighters use thermal imaging cameras. And these are somewhat bulky hand-held cameras that allow firefighters to see through smoke, to peer through dark areas to look for potential victims in the event of a rescue. With the development of the digital display technology we might be able to incorporate a smaller camera into a firefighter's helmet and perhaps have a digital display in the face shield for the mask allowing both hands to be free.

Announcer:
The technology that would make such a display possible involves an additional collaborative effort with the ASU flexible display center.

Greg Raupp:
I'm a technologist. I know pathway of process, I know the technology hurdles that need to be overcome to get to the point where I can make a flexible display. But I'm not a product designer. The innovation space, on the other hand, is a very creative way to get students engaged in the design process. The design process creates exciting new products, products that might actually end up out there in the real world. And that's why we're working together.

Announcer:
Innovation space students also have worked with ASU center for cognitive ubiquitous computing. The center is engaged in research that focuses on helping those who are visually impaired perform an assortment of every tasks, with the ease of sighted individuals.

Sethuraman Panchanathan:
We heard of the innovation space and we thought, wow, this would be a great collaboration to woman with them to help us take our research and preliminary prototypes into interesting product designs that we can help the population, in this case for the blind who want to have a reading device.

Announcer:
Cubix eye care reader is a device created to read documents to vision-impaired workers.

Sethuranman Panchanathan:
What we have is a desktop device which allows you to read books where a camera picks up the image of the book and an optical character recognition software reads the book in terms of its content. So we are currently in the first stage of the prototype development where the innovation space people have helped us.

Announcer:
The innovation space program is committed to the idea that design is a process that can solve problems and improve society. And that the best way to accomplish that is to provide future product designers for the most comprehensive array of skills possible.

Pradad Boradkar:
Often designers are seen as people who only provide an extent of skin to the products, that they do a cosmetic job, provide esthetic treatment and that's about. It and that does happen in the design work. However, what we try to do here is to inform students and to make them realize that the products that they design go out into the world and can have significant impact. Because when we design things they're manufactured in thousands, hundreds of thousands and maybe millions. So they have a significant impact on society and the environment. So we in innovation space try to equip students with the tools that they need to be good designers, to be responsible citizens and to be critical about the work that they do.

Michael Grant:
If you'd like a transcript of tonight's show, information on future topics, log on to the website at azpbs.org. Click on Horizon. Now a look at what's on tomorrow.

Nadine Arroyo:
Peter Likins, the man who led the University of Arizona for nearly ten years talks about he's tenure and plans for the future. And former Mexican cabinet member Juan Hernandez discusses his latest book on the illegal immigration crisis. That's on Horizon, Thursday at 7, here on 8.

Michael Grant:
After Horizon please stay tuned for Horizonte. Take a look at a new initiative by the Partnership for a Drug Free America. It targets teens use of prescription and over the counter drugs. That information on Horizonte, Thursday at 7:30 right after Horizon. Thank you very much for joining us on this Wednesday evening. I'm Michael Grant. Hope you have a great night. Good night.

serial shooter and Baseline killer


  • Phoenix police continue to hunt for the men who have terrorized the valley for months. And with the recent death of a Mesa woman, authorities are beefing up security and asking all residents, English and non-English speakers alike, to stay alert and assist with their capture. Tonight we get an update from City of Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris.
Guests:
  • Jack Harris - Phoenix Police Chief
  • Mark Shore - President and chief executive officer, Valley of the Sun Jewish Community Center


View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on Horizon, Phoenix police continue to hunt for the men who have terrorized the valley for months. And with the recent death of a Mesa woman, authorities are beefing up security and asking all residents, English and non-English speakers alike, to stay alert and assist with their capture. Tonight we get an update from City of Phoenix Police Chief Jack Harris. Then, thousands of young athletes will soon arrive in the valley for one of the largest teen Olympics in the world. The Maccabi Games will be held in Arizona and we'll talk with the event chair about the program and the economic impact for the state. And an ASU program at the College of Design that offers students an opportunity to create solutions to real problems for people. That's all next on Horizon.


Michael Grant:
Good evening, welcome to Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. Phoenix Police say they have a better description of the man linked to numerous murders, rapes and robberies in the valley. Authorities believe the man known as the ‘baseline killer', is dark skinned, between the ages of 25 and 30, about five-foot ten-inches tall and 170 pounds with a thin medium build. The ‘baseline killer' has been linked to crimes in the valley since August of 2005 when it's believed he first assaulted two teenage girls. Since his rampage he's thought to have terrorized 40 people...eight of them killed. Police say he searches for victims who are alone in the late evening hours. The reward for any information leading to the capture of the ‘baseline killer' and the ‘serial shooter' has increased to 100-thousand dollars each. The Phoenix police have held several community meetings to inform the public about updates and to encourage residents to assist in his capture. Here to talk about this and the case of the serial shooter is Phoenix police Chief Jack Harris.

Michael Grant:
Chief, thanks for being here.

Chief Jack Harris: You're welcome.

Michael Grant: You had a significant break through with the more detailed description that I just read?

Chief Jack Harris: I don't know if it would be considered a significant break through, but any information that we can get that more clearly defines what the suspect looks like is certainly of benefit to us and to the community.

Michael Grant: How critical was it finally linking forensically the death of the two women in February, I believe it was, over what, lower Baseline, 93rd avenue to this case? I know it filled in at least a time gap.

Chief Jack Harris: It did provide us with some information that was different than what we were seeing in the pattern. We were looking at a pattern of about every 30 days that this person would strike. And for some reason we saw that there was a gap there. That he didn't strike. So it was significant that we were able to tie that forensically to the other shootings and realize that there really wasn't a gap, it was still about the same as what it had been previously.

Michael Grant:
There was hope, I know, when that development occurred that just given the time of day, the traffic in that area, that kind of thing that there might have been perhaps more or better witnesses around the scene of those two shootings. Does that remain the hope?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes. That has been one of the problems with both of these serial criminals that we've been tracking is that we've had a very difficult time getting any information from any witnesses that can give us any kind of definitive information on the type of car, suspect, et cetera. So certainly anytime that there's a possibility of more witnesses, that's going to benefit us.

Michael Grant:
Because I seem to recall that was in the early morning hours. Well, they were getting ready for like a breakfast shift where people would start work and that kind of thing, operating one of those lunch wagons or breakfast wagons.

Chief Jack Harris:
That's right.

Michael Grant:
You're having the community meeting at Creighton School on East McDowell tonight?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes.

Michael Grant:
What's going to be covered there?

Chief Jack Harris:
We're going to attempt again to give community members an overview of what has happened, and again asking for their support and for their help. We still firmly believe that someone in the community, someone in the valley, knows information that will lead us to the people responsible for these crimes. So we're attempting to go out again tonight into the community. And in this case the Hispanic community, the Spanish-speaking community, that predominantly lives in the area where the serial rapist has been hitting. And ask them for assistance to come forward to us.

Michael Grant:
Also giving them the message that you can come forward with information and not fear that we're acting as agents for immigration and naturalization?

Chief Jack Harris:
Yes, absolutely. The fear that we run into in the Hispanic community, especially one that may be more heavily populated with immigrants from another country that may not be documented and here's the police walking up asking you to come and talk to us. And they have a fear that if they do so they're going to be arrested and deported. And they should certainly not feel that way tonight. We are there to help them by giving them the description, the information that we've got as much as we can to help them to remain safe in their own neighborhood. And what to be on the lookout for. But also to help us, because they may know something but they're afraid to come forward with the information or they haven't heard it in their own language.

Michael Grant:
Well, Phoenix police Chief Jack Harris, thanks very much for joining us. Obviously our fingers are crossed for the police department and the entire community that we track these two people down.

Chief Jack Harris:
Thank you.

Michael Grant:
It's known as one of the largest team sports competitions in the world. The JCC Maccabi games beginning this weekend with an opening day ceremony held on Sunday at the U.S. Airways Center. During the week long event teams will compete in track, swim, dance, baseball among many other sports. Cities throughout the world host the games every year. Phoenix is one of this year's host cities. Here's a glimpse as what the city can expect.

Announcer:
This is a once in a lifetime experience where Jewish teenagers take part in the competition hanging out with Jewish teens from around the world, participating in community service projects and dancing the night away in evening activities. That's a week of faith, fun and friendship. It's a thrill that can only be the JCC Maccabi games. The JCC Maccabi games begin when thousands of athletes, coaches, families, community leaders and volunteers from around the world arrive in the host city. Wherever you look you see Maccabi signs, Maccabi shirts, Maccabi bags as well as Maccabi athletes. Maccabi is everywhere.

Announcer:
Every one in the community is eager to meet the athletes, especially host families. The host family program is a unique feature of the JCC Maccabi games. Athletes are housed by local community families and quickly become much more than visitors.

Announcer:
A defining moment for athletes competing in the games is the parade into the stadium with their teams during opening ceremonies.

Announcer:
During the ceremony there is a tribute to the 11 Israeli athletes murdered at the 1972 Olympics in Munich. This memorial has become an important Maccabi tradition. The culminating moment of the opening ceremonies comes when the Maccabi flame enters the arena. The crowd explodes with excitement when the caldron which will burn the entire week of the game is finally lit.

Announcer:
The strive for athletic excellence is at the center of the JCC Maccabi games. Athletes compete for medals in 14 different sports. The competition is intense. And some athletes have practiced the entire year in preparation for the games. Many a future award-winning athlete began his or her career with Maccabi. Before swimmer Lenny Krayzelberg won gold at the 2000 summer Olympic Games he had won gold for team Los Angeles at the JCC Maccabi games. But sports are just a portion of what the JCC Maccabi games are about. Meaningful Jewish programs experienced at hang time with Israeli Shlichim help the athletes strengthen their Jewish identity. Another essential element of the games is a program called day of caring, day of sharing, which sends athletes throughout the host city to participate in various volunteer projects. The day of caring is a unique program that gives teens a hands-on example of preparing the work.

Softball Coach:
It takes the outside pitch to right field.

Basketball Coach:
Relax. Have fun.

Male Athlete:
Dreams come true.

Female Athlete:
I've had the greatest time and met so many people.

Male Athlete:
It's a big adrenaline rush.

Male Athlete:
I've never done anything like this before. I'm really excited.

Female Athlete:
I didn't know there were so many Jewish people in America.

Announcer:
The JCC Maccabi games have seen past participants return to become coaches, host families or delegates themselves. In this way the JCC Maccabi tradition is passed on to new participants. The JCC Maccabi games are much more than athletics, much more than competition. The games are the people whose lives are touched.

Michael Grant:
Joining us tonight to talk about the upcoming Phoenix Maccabi games is Mark Shore. He is the president and chief executive officer of the valley of the sun Jewish Community Center. Mark, this is neat.

Mark Shore:
Great stuff.

Michael Grant:
Yes.

Michael Grant: I guess I've been living under a rock. This is the first I ever heard of it. Is this the first time Phoenix has been a venue for it?

Mark Shore: Correct. The JCC Maccabi games actually began 24 years ago in Memphis, Tennessee. We put in a bid about two years ago to bring it to the valley. We had to fill out lots and lots of forms, make some Guarantees and here we are. The games begin this Sunday.

Michael Grant:
Now, there's a New Orleans tie to this, correct?

Mark Shore:
Correct. Originally the New Orleans Jewish community center was scheduled to run the games this week. However, Hurricane Katrina came. And we now became the first week and New Orleans delegation will be coming here.

Michael Grant:
Are there qualifying roundtables to get here?

Mark Shore:
Well, each of the athletes are really connected to their own local community in roughly 6 to 8 months before the games begin each community has tryouts. And the children will try out for baseball, softball, soccer, table tennis, swimming, basketball. And all in all about 14 sports that the youth can try out for. And once they're chosen they represent their community at the North American games.

Michael Grant:
Now, this was imported from Israel, right? It's been going on in Israel for a longer time.

Mark Shore:
Right. And they have the Maccabi and games or as they call them the Maccabiate. And we wanted to create something in North America that can help youth connect. Not only youth but parents. Each of the athletes is going to be helped by local families. And throughout the week they have the opportunity to connect, make friends from all over the world.

Michael Grant:
Now, the games are not just about athletics, correct?


Mark Shore:
Certainly not. The real message to the games is athletics and physical fitness is important, friendly competition is important. We will have gold medals, silver and bronze medals. But what's more important to us is when the child leaves at the end of the games that they have made new friends from all over the world.

Michael Grant:
I'm sure being housed with local people as opposed to in hotels I'm sure that fosters that as well.

Mark Shore:
And I think the spirit of the games fosters that. On Monday night we have host family night and each of these families will be not only having meals with the children but also doing something exciting like come to a Diamondbacks game or visit other valley sights. The host families actually -- and during the week of the games we see many of the host families if not all who come to the competitions and cheer for their athlete.

Michael Grant:
Tell us a little bit more about the Jewish Community Council.

Mark Shore:
The Jewish Community Center has been in business here in the valley since 1945. We are a community-serving agency that serves everyone regardless of religion or background. We have a whole host of programs from daycare, preschool, all the way through and including programs for seniors. Lots of programs in the fitness world as well as in the arts and cultural arts connections. We have lots of activities, school holiday programs. We have a very, very successful day camp-- that serves about a thousand different children throughout the summer. A very melting pot and everyone gets involved.

Michael Grant:
Well, and you guys got to feel pretty good about being one of the -- it's one of three venues, right?

Mark Shore:
Correct. This year there is three. We have the first week. The week after us you have the games in Stamford, Connecticut and Vancouver, British Columbia.

Michael Grant:
Mark Shore, thank you very much for joining us. Cool deal. Thanks for talking about it.

Mark Shore:
Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Development of a new product is a complex undertaking that involves elements of engineering design and business at the ASU College of Design. The university's ace program provides students with each of those disciplines. The program also creates for its participants a unique entrepreneurial atmosphere that promotes positive social change.

Announcer:
A firefighter's equipment can mean the difference between life and death. But sometimes the design of that equipment can make a dangerous situation even more so. At ASU's college of design, that is just the sort of real-world challenge that students are learning to tackle.

Pradad Boradkar:
This is a transdisciplinary research and education lab where we bring together students and faculty to work on new product development and new product design, which is socially and environmentally responsible. The program involves senior level students in industrial design, graphic design, business and engineering who work on their senior year capstone projects on a thesis. And what the students do is come up with ideas for new products that solve real problems for real people.

Spencer Dodge:
Not only is it a place where different majors get together but it's a laboratory where we grow together, we learn together. We learn things about the real world. How to truly create a product from conceptualization all the way to building a prototype in the most functional working phase that we possibly can. It's as close to reality within the university environment as you can get.

Announcer:
The innovation space program was founded in 2004 by the late Paul Rothstein, an associate professor of industrial design who created a unique approach to design and development called integrated innovation.

Pradad Boradkar:
When the students are given the assignment to come up with new product ideas they ask four key questions. They ask, are these ideas desirable for people? So we think of user-centered product design and development. Will they benefit society and the environment? So is it good for society? The third question they ask is, will it bring value to business? So does it make economic sense to do this? And the fourth is, is it possible to engineer it. And unless we have a decent answer to those four questions we think it's not true innovation. And that's what sets us apart from the rest of the people doing similar stuff.

Announcer:
The student teams begin the actual design process with extensive research in areas such as consumer needs, market trends and available technology. In addition to interacting with potential users.

Pradad Boradkar:
So we start with research, analyze that information, then step into brainstorming. How can we come up with product ideas? What opportunities exist out in the world that we can then transform into good product designs? Then we go into the process of trying out some of their designs, testing them, evaluating them, coming up with esthetic solutions and ergonomic solutions and ideas that would really make a difference.

Announcer:
The teams translate their ideas into detailed sketches and models and ultimately new business venture proposals.

Pradad Boradkar:
Each proposal includes a product design idea, a brand strategy and communication strategy, an engineering feasibility assessment and a business and marketing plan. Then it becomes the intellectual property that students generate in the class.

Announcer:
One of the most critical elements of the innovation space program is an involvement of a variety of partners or sponsors in the process of new design and product development. One such collaboration involves the Phoenix fire department and efforts to create a new generation of self--contained breathing apparatus or SCBA.

Kurt Hinkle:
These are air packs that can enable firefighters to go into toxic environments to perform rescue work. One of the problems with the current configuration of SCBA design is they are big and bulky and the firefighters have lost their lives by becoming trapped and entangled during firefighting efforts. One of the concepts we're working on that ASU would be to streamline that design so that it would be safer for firefighters.

Announcer:
Another product design collaboration with the fire department involves thermal imaging technology.

Kurt Hinkle:
Firefighters use thermal imaging cameras. And these are somewhat bulky hand-held cameras that allow firefighters to see through smoke, to peer through dark areas to look for potential victims in the event of a rescue. With the development of the digital display technology we might be able to incorporate a smaller camera into a firefighter's helmet and perhaps have a digital display in the face shield for the mask allowing both hands to be free.

Announcer:
The technology that would make such a display possible involves an additional collaborative effort with the ASU flexible display center.

Greg Raupp:
I'm a technologist. I know pathway of process, I know the technology hurdles that need to be overcome to get to the point where I can make a flexible display. But I'm not a product designer. The innovation space, on the other hand, is a very creative way to get students engaged in the design process. The design process creates exciting new products, products that might actually end up out there in the real world. And that's why we're working together.

Announcer:
Innovation space students also have worked with ASU center for cognitive ubiquitous computing. The center is engaged in research that focuses on helping those who are visually impaired perform an assortment of every tasks, with the ease of sighted individuals.

Sethuraman Panchanathan:
We heard of the innovation space and we thought, wow, this would be a great collaboration to woman with them to help us take our research and preliminary prototypes into interesting product designs that we can help the population, in this case for the blind who want to have a reading device.

Announcer:
Cubix eye care reader is a device created to read documents to vision-impaired workers.

Sethuranman Panchanathan:
What we have is a desktop device which allows you to read books where a camera picks up the image of the book and an optical character recognition software reads the book in terms of its content. So we are currently in the first stage of the prototype development where the innovation space people have helped us.

Announcer:
The innovation space program is committed to the idea that design is a process that can solve problems and improve society. And that the best way to accomplish that is to provide future product designers for the most comprehensive array of skills possible.

Pradad Boradkar:
Often designers are seen as people who only provide an extent of skin to the products, that they do a cosmetic job, provide esthetic treatment and that's about. It and that does happen in the design work. However, what we try to do here is to inform students and to make them realize that the products that they design go out into the world and can have significant impact. Because when we design things they're manufactured in thousands, hundreds of thousands and maybe millions. So they have a significant impact on society and the environment. So we in innovation space try to equip students with the tools that they need to be good designers, to be responsible citizens and to be critical about the work that they do.

Michael Grant:
If you'd like a transcript of tonight's show, information on future topics, log on to the website at azpbs.org. Click on Horizon. Now a look at what's on tomorrow.

Nadine Arroyo:
Peter Likins, the man who led the University of Arizona for nearly ten years talks about he's tenure and plans for the future. And former Mexican cabinet member Juan Hernandez discusses his latest book on the illegal immigration crisis. That's on Horizon, Thursday at 7, here on 8.

Michael Grant:
After Horizon please stay tuned for Horizonte. Take a look at a new initiative by the Partnership for a Drug Free America. It targets teens use of prescription and over the counter drugs. That information on Horizonte, Thursday at 7:30 right after Horizon. Thank you very much for joining us on this Wednesday evening. I'm Michael Grant. Hope you have a great night. Good night.

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