Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

August 10, 2010


Host: Ted Simons

Phoenix Community Engagement and Outreach Task Force

  |   Video
  • A task force that aims to improve police-community relations is conducting a series of public meetings during the month of August. Task Force Chairman Gerald Richard talks about the effort.
Guests:
  • Gerald Richard
Category: Law

View Transcript
Ted Simons:
Good evening and welcome to "Horizon." I'm Ted Simons. An altercation last March between a black Phoenix city councilman and a white police officer prompted a significant public outcry, including the formation of a city taskforce to examine how police interact with the community. This month, the Phoenix community engagement and outreach taskforce is holding a series of public hearings around the valley. It's an opportunity for residents to voice their concerns and share their experiences with Phoenix Police. Taskforce member Gerald Richard is chairing the hearings. He's a former Phoenix Police administrator who currently works for the state attorney general as a special policy advisor. Gerald Richard is here tonight with more about the taskforce hearings. Good to see you again.

Gerald Richards:
Good to see you as well.

Ted Simons:
Did the incident with councilman Johnson, was this something that the taskforce came out of or was it in development before that?

Gerald Richards:
That's something that chief Harris mentioned when the -- they had the meeting at the city council, that this was something he wanted to do. I can't really tell you whether or not it came out of it. I know that the incident with regards to councilman Johnson has been resolved and we're moving forward in making sure we listen to the community as far as what they think we can do in order to make the police department a better place.

Ted Simons:
As far as goals are for the hearings and the taskforce, is it that open up the lines of communication?

Gerald Richards:
It's to reopen the lines of communication maybe with some citizens that haven't been involved with our citizen advisory boards or the police academy or block watches and it's an opportunity to step forward and say this is what the police are doing and this is what I see here, some accommodations and as well as concerns.

Ted Simons:
You had the first meeting last night.

Gerald Richards:
It was 2802 east DEVONshire.

Ted Simons:
What did you hear?

Gerald Richards:
We heard there were some citizens that wanted to make sure that the officers took the time in order to introduce themselves, got a chance to know the citizens around there, that there was more involvement between the youth and police that worked on some issues with regard to how we approach our citizens on traffic stops and things along those lines.

Ted Simons:
Was it relatively well attended?

Gerald Richards:
In light of the fact that the commander in that particular area was -- they credited him with a lot as far as the fact he came in and worked quite a bit with the community, and a lot of the -- they self-professed community activists, in order to make sure he addressed those issues in order to improve community-based policing.

Ted Simons:
Youth summits, one was last Saturday and the next will be in Maryville this Saturday. What are you looking forward from them?

Gerald Richards:
A -- a lot haven't had interaction with the police and we want to hear how we can work with them better and what we're finding almost the same thing we heard last night and that is that the police need to learn more about them and they need to learn more about the police. It's a two-way Street on both sides.

Ted Simons:
Is this something in the past -- I know we've heard about taskforces and had public meetings regarding the police in the community in the past. How far -- how much do you get out of these things?

Gerald Richards:
They go a long way, let me tell you, especially the Phoenix police. They've been working with citizen advisory boards for a number of years. And police academies. Maybe refugee communities and Muslim communities and communities that may not have had a positive working relationship with the police force where they grew up where they lived. And now you have 40 individuals, community leaders from all different backgrounds and probably one of the most groups I've seen farce law enforcement and they're investing their time to reach out to the groups that are out there. Not only do you have the six meetings and the couple of meetings we had with the teens, but each of them identified taskforces where we can sit down as colleagues and talk about issues that deal with the police in order to take that information back. This is something I haven't seen anywhere in the nation. Phoenix Police is at the cutting edge in working with the community, listening to the community and developing a plan in order to make that relationship a lot better.

Ted Simons:
It's one thing to communicate and listen, and it's another thing for folks to figure it out and get along on both sides. Are you getting a little bit of this still going on or people starting to figure out how to work together?

Gerald Richards:
People are figuring out how to work together but it's going to take a while. It's not something that happens overnight. We have a lot of new officers on board. Incidents from way back when but you have to remember, the Phoenix Police has pulled off things that other agencies have not been able to do. When 150,000 people marched through the city of Phoenix, there was not one arrest. And this was the way the department was able to work with the different communities and as well as form late a March of that magnitude, the largest in the city of Arizona.

Ted Simons:
Before we go, we mentioned Councilman Johnson, that incident. Talk about the impact on the community.

Gerald Richards:
Since then, there's been concern with regard to how the police may interact as far as in the south Phoenix area, however with a number of things, specifically, assistant chief Jerry Williams has been able to do with the commanders in that area, they've moved forward with working with the police and the training and the reaching out, more so as far as the officers. So I'm extremely happy to see, not only what Jerry is doing with south Phoenix but in north Phoenix and that division.

Ted Simons:
We've got a list. Six general hearings and two youth summits, correct?

Gerald Richards:
That's correct.

Ted Simons:
And the next one being in paradise valley and these are going to be all over the community.

Gerald Richards:
They will be.

Ted Simons:
Ok.

Gerald Richards:
And each of the citizen advisory boards will be meeting, another way in which open lines of communication and dialogue making the police department the best in the world.

Ted Simons:
Thanks for being on the show.

Gerald Richards:
Thanks for having me.

Protecting Arizona’s Jobs

  |   Video
  • Economic development and business leaders say other states are making a new push to lure companies away from Arizona. Find out what they think Arizona must do to increase its competitiveness.
Guests:
  • Barry Broome - President & CEO, Greater Phoenix Economic Council
  • Robert Anderson - President, Prismagraphic
Category: Business/Economy

View Transcript
Ted Simons:
The Virginia economic development partnership is trying to lure Arizona companies to Virginia. The group is touting the state's low taxes and excellent education system as reasons to relocate. Here to talk about all of this is Barry Broome president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, and Bob Anderson, president of Prisma-Graphic, a print solutions provider that does business worldwide. He met with the Virginia group in May. Good to have you here.

Barry Broome:
Good to be here.

Ted Simons:
Barry, start with you. Are certain businesses being targeted?

Barry Broome:
Arizona's competitive position isn't being maintained and other states that are starting to come in and call on California, historically, are starting to swing through our state. We've asked business leaders as you've been contacted with other states and they've shared their economic package, would you share with us. And Virginia has been targeting the aerospace and the manufacturing sector in Arizona.

Ted Simons:
Has this happened before since you've been here?

Barry Broome:
It has not. And this is the first time we've seen this. We think there are two things that are important to understand. Number one, California has been this magnet for recruitment from states all over the country -- North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama. And while in California, they're swinging through Arizona and a discussion that's occurring with our businesses is the competitive advantage that Virginia offers over Arizona and I think it's an important moment for us from a policy making standpoint to graduate to competitiveness here in Arizona.

Ted Simons:
Your business was targeted. Talk to us about this.

Robert Anderson:
I think it was targeted because we have very centristic manufacturing company and they're looking for companies that have a high profile and come to Virginia, look at expanding the business to Virginia or moving your business to Virginia.

Ted Simons:
What was the pitch?

Robert Anderson:
I think the pitch is that they -- the most important, they start to talk about the education system. One of the top education systems for high schools and colleges in the nation. They talk about lower taxes, lower sales tax, lower business taxes. And I think quality of the environment for the real pro-business. They want businesses to be there.

Ted Simons:
Was it more a Virginia is this or a Arizona is that?

Richard Anderson:
I think it was Virginia is this, but we're coming here because Arizona has some problems and are you going to stay in Arizona and face the problems or do you want to pick up and go?

Ted Simons:
Is this something you've been hearing from other businesses as well?

Berry Broome:
We've heard that the aerospace sector has been targeted by Virginia and Tennessee and we have the documentation and we're going to share that with policymakers and one of the important opportunities for this is to educate our policymakers on what it takes to build a great economy and in the presentation of which GPEC will make available. They did side-by-side comparisons. Tax ranks, job training, economic development programs and talk to you about building a building. They can provide a building and they can train your people and they have relocation expenses. And the counter to that in Arizona is we don't have those things. We don't have those types of policy achievements here in Arizona and as our competition for jobs increases, it's something that has addressed.

Ted Simons:
What do you tell policymakers, here's what's going on out there. What should we tell them? What should we do?

Berry Broome:
We have a continuing challenge on the budget side. So we have to meet and balance our budget. But while we're meeting and balancing the budget, the question is, is it adequate for what we need to do competitively. If we're 25% below the average in education and 15% below the average in universities, Virginia is pitching a educational model and tax policy needs to be thoughtful too. We did this two years ago with legislators showing them that states have lower taxes on businesses, better economic strategies and improving or better educational systems and going down this path of understanding the economy, small government or getting out of the way of business is not nearly sophisticated enough thinking for Arizona to achieve its rightful position in the marketplace.

Ted Simons:
When Virginia came after you and mentioned lower taxes and education and quality of life, of those three, was there one they really emphasized and thought would get you?

Richard Anderson:
I think if you look at where they push it, it's education. Their workforce is going to be much better educated than what we have currently in our K-12, especially high schoolers that want to be either in light manufacturing, looking for manufacturing jobs, going to trade schools and that type of thing. They have an unbelievable educational program and there's even schooling for doctors and they have a lot better education program there. Their tech schools for science are much -- two of the schools are top in the nations for high schools.

Ted Simons:
Were you tempted at all?

Richard Anderson:
No, you know, I'm a third generation Arizonan. I have 135 employees. My family is here. My -- I have 135 employees' families that are here. I'm not tempted. What I want to see is I want to see Arizona I think we're lost right now and I want us to get back on track and move forward as a -- as both business and government together. Get the distractions away and move forward.

Ted Simons:
The political climate in Arizona, how much of a factor is this?

Barry Broome:
We're not portrayed in the best light and what people are watching right now, the discussion of the boycotts and the budgets and the controversy, we look like a state that's vulnerable and so whereas, we've been a national leader often in job performance and we spend a lot of time being portrayed in a positive light, when that goes in another direction, people see you as vulnerable and if you're going to sew an array of state development organizations with tools and job training coming into Arizona, I'm not surprised they focused on education. We go and talk in a competitive market about our state we try to find where we're strongest and where they're weakest and the educational debate that occurred with this executive had the fact to do with Virginia was strong and our budget problems are still there. 45, 50 kids in a classroom. This is portrayed across the United States and people observing this and paying attention and they're going to set a strategy to move us out of the market position we've been in and Virginia is the first example of this.

Ted Simons:
The headlines that Arizona is attracting and prompting, obviously affecting folks coming here and trying to lure Arizona company as way. How is it affecting you in trying to recruit companies to come here? Harder these days?

Barry Broome:
The solar renewable companies have been expanding and Governor Brewer has done a great job working with companies. I want to be fair and equitable in this discuss. So when we're one on one with a company, we're able to get beyond the hurdles. The feedback from the marketplace is more on the convention side. One of the things that's starting to affect a lot of multinationals are finding it difficult to recruit talent here. I don't know that I could report we've lost business coming here because of these issues. We haven't, but the businesses are starting to raise other questions about our competitiveness and the recruitment of talent for businesses that have come here has gotten more difficult.

Ted Simons:
What's the lesson for Arizona in this?

Richard Anderson:
I think the lesson is really to get our schools back in shape. Get us to be -- not to be in the bottom, 49. But take a look at our tax rate on businesses and reevaluate the sales tax, I think that's going to be a problem. I know right now it's a short term help but long term it's going to hurt competitiveness. People will buy on the internet more. And take away tax revenue to the state. So I'd say let's get everybody focused back on -- let's get businesses going again in Arizona and jobs going in Arizona. Let's focus on jobs and get jobs for people in Arizona and work on that. That's my mantra. Get jobs back at the forefront.

Ted Simons:
Predatory states, lessons learned. What do we have.

Barry Broome:
It's not your philosophy. It's how competitive you are. And Arizona policymakers need to build a data driven exercise on how we're competitive. What's our corporate income tax rate versus competitors. What's our delivery on workforce and educational attainment versus competitors and what's the tax policy for being competitive and move from the populist model that's put us in a position where we're not as strong as we should be and get moving in a new direction.

Ted Simons:
Gentlemen, thanks for joining us.

UA College of Medicine - Phoenix

  |   Video
  • Dr. Stuart D. Flynn, Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine, discusses the latest news involving the downtown Phoenix medical school.
Guests:
  • Dr. Stuart D. Flynn - Dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine
Category: Medical/Health

View Transcript
Ted Simons:
The U of A college of medicine-Phoenix is currently training the next generation of doctors. And just this week, it announced a partnership with the Phoenix children's hospital that will make it a premier location for pediatric healthcare, training and research. Here with more on that partnership is Dr. Stewart Flynn, dean of the U of A college of medicine in downtown Phoenix. The affiliation with the children's hospital, talk to us about this.

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
It's a full affiliation in the sense, we will do education with PCH and do research with PCH and clinic care with PCH. So this is a full-fledged academic affiliation. And a pediatric affiliation in. They're entirely pediatric and subdisciplines and patients under the age of 18.

Ted Simons:
Tell me how, address the pediatric shortage of doctors here in Arizona.

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
The shortage is quite stark and hence the value of the medical school training more physicians and the pediatrics care, it's one of them where there's a shortage in the state and countrywide and a study that came out in the last week, also illustrated that there's a significant shortage of pediatric subspecialties and even though that's not the case in some of the adult arena, that's the case in part of this affiliation is meant to grow pediatric fellowships to train subspecialists.

Ted Simons:
Why is that shortage? What's going on there?

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
I think it's a reimbursement issue. These young people go to medical school and they're wise as to what they're choices are and lifestyles and the like and it's different than when my generation and the generation prior to me went to medical school and I'm not elevating my status in that regard. And the other thing is, and this is where the relationship will be very valuable, they look at models and now our students will see in a very robust way with the country's biggest children's hospital and they get turned on by that, so this will be a nice inducement for our students to go on to pediatrics.

Ted Simons:
Is it worse in Arizona than other parts of the country?

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
I don't know in pediatrics, we're one of the worst state force short ands of physicians and I would then make the assumption that we're probably down there in pediatrics also.

Ted Simons:
Obviously, talking about the shortage of doctors, what about faculty, research science and these things? How does this collaboration, how does this affiliation impact those things?

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
This is a major part. And they're intimately tied. So train fellows in -- in any residency discipline but this is pediatrics and subspecialties, by mandating the subspecialties they have to have a research component. PCH by themselves would struggle as any free standing hospital to bring the breadth of research to attract the best residences and fellows to come into their program. We've become a nice underpinning for all of that.

Ted Simons:
It sounds like research will be expanded here. Training of doctors expanding, are there new avenue, new ways of thinking regarding training of doctors that you guys are involved in.

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
Absolutely. And so one of the strong components of our school is -- and this is not unique. It's a buzzword across the country -- is the interprofessional training of healthcare disciplines where doctors and nurses and pharmacists and physicians' assistants and social workers know how to work together. It makes total intuitive sense that that's the way that healthcare should be delivered and we've been patients and we know that's how we like to be taken care of. The schools have not done a good job working collaboratively and we're doing that nicely and we have a big vision that we hope to accomplish here.

Ted Simons:
Speaking of collaboration, the collaboration with ASU has changed. Talk about what happened there and what you are trying to do.

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
What happened is probably at the presidential level but it's a fiscal, certainly a huge part was a fiscal reality that all of the three major universities have to be careful where they put their resources. The legacy of the ASU partnership, I should add, and to name David young as one individual, will be a very nice legacy and people are not going to know that, but we know that who have been there David and colleagues. So presently, we have still very strong collaborations with areas of ASU, with areas that want to grow collaborations but to your point, a big one still is the Arizona school of nursing, and we actually have a Macy's grant for medicine, nursing and pharmacy to put together an interprofessional curriculum that actually looks at training the three disciplines to work together in rural Arizona. So that's a very, very -- that's a nationally recognized collaborative effort.

Ted Simons:
And they include some research, faculty as well? Hasn't been completely severed there, correct?

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
No, no, absolutely and that will grow with time. That's what academic medical centers do. They find scientists regardless of the field. Find people that think like they to, have the same vision they do and can bring additional intellectual property to the mission. So, yes, different colleges and universities but you don't want to get between a scientist and another regardful the politics. They want to collaborate because that’s how they make discoveries.

Ted Simons:
As far as operating cost, that has to be a concern. What are you seeing out there?

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
Operating costs are absolutely a big deal and we're in a trough in that regard and so we have to find sources of revenue and those sources include grant funding and certainly include state funding. And -- and philanthropy and individual who's -- and groups of individuals that have a vision for -- and usually it's earmarked for something. Whatever area that individual wants to contribute to and then you develop your research mission around those kind of funding sources.

Ted Simons:
So the PCH, that affiliation is up and going and strong and pretty optimistic about it?

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
Very, both institutions are very upbeat about this and -- and it is a family and it feels like a family.

Ted Simons:
Very good. Thank you very much for joining us.

Dr. Stewart Flynn:
Thank you.

Content Partner: