Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

April 7, 2008


Host: Ted Simons

One on One


  • Bob Grossfeld of Media Guys and Stan Barnes of Copper State Consulting Group debate issues of interest at the state Legislature.
Guests:
  • Bob Grossfeld - The Media Guys
  • Stan Barnes - Copper State Consulting Group


View Transcript
Ted Simons:
Now for our regularly scheduled Monday feature, on issues of concern regarding the legislature in upcoming elections, two political types are going one on one tonight. Bob Grossfeld goes head to head with Stan Barnes, the founder of copper state consulting group.

Stan Barnes:
I want to talk about my friend senator John McCain.

Bob Grossfeld:
If you must.

Stan Barnes:
I must. This man is an Arizonan, and I think he's going to be president of the United States. This week he did his geographical tour, he was in Annapolis and Pensacola, and in the Prescott courthouse like Barry Goldwater of 1964. There were thousands of people out there. I was very proud to see him and to see him evoke the bipartisan spirit of Morris Udall and Barry Goldwater and getting things done. I think he's going to do well in November and make Arizona proud,

Bob Grossfeld:
So basically you're saying you like the fact that he rides on a bus and goes to all these places that are war remembrances.

Stan Barnes:
yeah.

Bob Grossfeld:
This is like a war in remembrance tour for John McCain.

Stan Barnes:
You think this is going to turn on the war, his election is going to turn on the war, right?

Bob Grossfeld:
I think clearly he was focusing, whether he meant to or not, every stop was something connected to what used to be. And his positions on the war and his involvement in war.

Stan Barnes:
I sense a campaign theme by the democrats, right? What they used to be versus the future, the old versus the new, the has-been versus --

Bob Grossfeld:
That's a great thought, never occurred to me.

Stan Barnes:
So predictable. But nonetheless, I think there's a certain amount of attraction. John McCain has to overcome the fact that many people are upset about the war. But I think he can argue why you should let him be president because we have to deal with it, the war is not going to go away.

Bob Grossfeld:
Well, it's certainly not going to go away if Mr. McCain has his way. From the get-go, all he's really wanted to do is do the escalation, which was being called the surge earlier. But I'm serious, and I don't think most people are seeing any more of what's his plan to actually get us out of there. And setting aside the faux pas when he said, we'll be there a hundred years, setting that aside, it's as if he sees some grand mission in Iraq that I think 80\% of the population just doesn't see. That's a big problem, wouldn't you agree?

Stan Barnes:
I don't agree. He does see that it's in our long-term interests.

Bob Grossfeld:
Let's talk about our interests as a state.

Stan Barnes:
Okay.

Bob Grossfeld: I know you and others have -- well, not pontificated, but talked about the McCain effect on Arizona . And basically they're, well, yeah, democrats should probably just hang it up and not really try too hard in November, because a favorite son will be out there at the top of the ticket.

Stan Barnes:
The very top, yes. I think what he's going to do is quash my democratic friends' hopes of having the statehouse the first time since 1966. When one man, one vote took place in 1966, that was the last time the democrats were in the majority in the statehouse. There's a lot of talk about them getting the majority back because they believe their time has come after 42 years. John mccain on the ballot brings out republicans and independents that will vote for him. That down the line will put a damper on democratic hopes.

Bob Grossfeld:
Explain to me how that would have that effect, if for instance it's on the wrong side of 80\% of the population about Iraq. He has virtually nothing to say about the economy, other than good luck, we'll see you when the recession is over if you're still around. And one thing after the other. Health care, all of the issues that have surfaced and are now part of the dialogue of the campaign, because they're affecting individuals here in Arizona and frankly throughout the country, how is that going to have the effect of, well, let's all get out and vote for John McCain?

Stan Barnes:
Most people in Arizona don't share your view, and John McCain is going to win Arizona , which is going to bring people to the ballot and do things to effect the elections. Enough of that, let's shift gears. I got a sense that one day we're going to wake up and there's going to be a new sheriff in town. What I mean by that is, Joe Arpaio, who I support, has been doing his thing for 15 years. It almost feels like there's a new sheriff Joe Arpaio, in the sense that that man has more energy and is covering the valley in more of a blanket than i've seen him do in all the time there. He's been probably the most high-profile sheriff in all of Arizona history. But with his crime suppression stuff he's doing in Guadalupe and parts of phoenix and maybe the east valley, he's making some big news.

Bob Grossfeld:
Again, we're at a matter of perception. I think one man's crime suppression is another person's, oh, my god, they're going to come and wipe out the entire neighborhood, hide the children because they can't distinguish between who's here legally and not legally. That's really a profoundly scary thing to a lot of people whose skin color isn't yours or mine.

Stan Barnes:
It's hard for the local politicians to fight with him on it because it makes them look like they're on the side of people that are breaking the law. Their idea is basically, don't enforce the law, and even though there are nuances that I understand, it doesn't translate in the public arena. It looks like the guy what wants to enforce the law versus those who don't.

Bob Grossfeld:
He's choosing that law rather than going around and collecting up the 60,000 criminals with arrest warrants out there that he's just not being able to find in his moving around the valley and invading neighborhoods.

Stan Barnes:
Do you fear one day you'll open your front door and the tank will be pointing at you from the street?

Bob Grossfeld:
Not at all. Joe, if you're listening, I really like you. Let's move on. There is something both you and I do agree on.

Stan Barnes:
And that is?

Bob Grossfeld:
Term limits, and how stupid they've turned out to be.

Stan Barnes:
I have to mea culpa for all our viewers. In 1992, I thought this was a great idea. It stemmed out of the federal government projection which I being a republican, was in the wilderness for 40 years back in the day. I wanted term limits as a way to shake up the place. I thought they were a great idea in 1992. I work at the legislature, I've seen it play out and it hasn't done what voters hoped it'll do, it's done worse.

Bob Grossfeld:
That's absolutely right. What we now have is such a churn and rotation, I think the best you can say about maintaining any kind of institutional knowledge is they're moving from the senate to the house and the house to the senate, and back and forth. And constantly looking for a new gig to run for. And it's leaving my friends who are lobbyists over there going, well, I kind of remember a few things, and I can help you out.

Stan Barnes:
I've been there 20 years and I'm like the old man who can remember things. But it has so gained the system, you're already looking to jump where you need to jump, the minute you're elected.

Bob Grossfeld:
I could even live with term limits if we could get the district system fixed so we have competitive races. It was an effort to eject that competition.

Stan Barnes:
We'll leave that topic for another day.

Bob Grossfeld:
And we will. And it was a great experience and I look forward to it again.

Stan Barnes:
Good being with you.

Bob Grossfeld:
We're done.

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