Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

June 10, 2008


Host: Ted Simons

RN Shortage

  |   Video
  • Arizona faces one of the nation�s most critical shortages of registered nurses (RNs), according to an Arizona Healthcare Workforce Data Center study that ranks the need for RNs nationwide. Kathy Scott, RN, PhD, regional vice president of Clinical Services for Banner Health joins us to discuss the study, and the shortage of RNs.
Guests:
  • Kathy Scott - Regional Vice President of Clinical Services, Banner Health
Category: Medical/Health

View Transcript
Ted Simons:
Arizona faces one of the nation's most critical shortages of registered nurses, according to a study from the newly established Arizona healthcare workforce data center. The study, released by the Arizona hospital and healthcare association, does a state and county ranking of the need for R.N.s. in a moment, we will talk more about the nursing shortage and its implications in Arizona. First, here is a brief look at some of the data from the study.

Merry Lucero:
The Arizona healthcare work force center study indicates that we will need 55,000 new registered nurse by 2017. It's needed to keep up with the state's rapidly growing population and replace R.N.s retiring. The current ratio nationally is 825 to 100,000 residents in Arizona it's 681 to 100,000. 20,000 new R.N.s will be needed to fill the gap with population growth. 10,000 are required to replace retiring R.N.s with one-third of those older than 55. According to the study, the professions attrition rate is 3.5\%. So 19,000 new R.N.s annually will be needed to make up for deficit.

Ted Simons:
joining us now to talk more about the study and the shortage of registered nurses is Kathy Scott who is an R.N. and also regional vice president of clinical services for banner health. Good to have you here. Thank you for joining us.

Kathy Scott:
I appreciate you asking me to be here.

Ted Simons:
You bet. How serious is this shortage?

Kathy Scott:
this is a serious shortage and i've been a nurse for many decades. And we've had shortages on and off. But this one is really significant because of the aging nursing population and pending retirements coming up here.

Ted Simons:
I think a lot of people don't consider that when you talk about an industry. Do nurses right now are nurses are they tending to be middle aged and older? What's the age factor?

Kathy Scott:
the average age of a nurse around the country is 44. One-third of the work force in Arizona is 55 or older. The average age of a nurse coming into a profession is older. We have a lot of people second careers coming in later than the traditional student.

Ted Simons:
what about attrition? Is that a problem is this.

Kathy Scott:
attrition is typical at 3.5\% a year. Of course if we could get that number down, we would actually help the situation somewhat as well.

Ted Simons:
as bad as things are in the state in general, i'm assuming in rural area we're talking critical need?

Kathy Scott:
there is any area where you don 't have local universities and colleges, you can expect to have lower numbers of nurses capita and that's true in Arizona.

Ted Simons:
do the rural areas suffer from not having specialized nurses?

Kathy Scott:
they do. And we suffer from that with the rural and urban areas. I think the goal is to find the specialist and stretch them as far as we can in the variety of ways using technology that we haven't had available in the past. It is an issue in rural and urban America right now.

Ted Simons:
can you give us an example of the technology that's being used to help out?

Kathy Scott:
sure one of the newer models care delivery is EICU. Which is physician which are critical care specialists and critical care nurses in remote site using technology to monitor a number of patients in a number of hospitals across several states. You're taking that expertise and adding it to the current model to provide a newer nurse and a newer physician added support. It goes a long way for patient's safety and quality of care.

Ted Simons:
still obviously you need more bodies, you need more nurses. How is education factoring into all of this?

Kathy Scott:
education has been really working with practice setting to increase the number of enrollee's in their programs. The state is actually added additional funds over the last several years so that we can add additional faculty. We continue to have shortages. There's pay issues. Nurses are usually paid more in a hospital setting versus an academic. The average age of a faculty nurse is higher than that of a nurse in practice at the bedside.

Ted Simons:
it sounds as if Arizona is behind the curve a little bit or maybe a lot, why?

Kathy Scott:
well, actually Arizona isn't that behind. The west is behind the curve. I think part of it is the growth that we experienced here. Utah or Nevada, California, Alaska, Hawaii are all similar in a similar boat as Arizona. But even in areas that have a larger number of R.N.s per capita, I'll still hearing from my colleagues across the country that they are experiencing nursing shortages. For example here in Arizona, we have 681 R.N.s per residents 100,000 residents. In some parts of country we have 1200. In those states I'm still hearing we don't have enough nurses. It's a private care delivery model.

Ted Simons:
indeed it almost sounds as if there are some systematic problems here. How do you address that? Is it a constant game of catch up?

Kathy Scott:
it is. I think we need to think differently about how we train and educate our nurses and how we on board a larger number of new grads. More novices in the workplace. We need more technology to assist us and expanding the role of the expert in keeping the nurses in the work force longer. Using simulation in training versus being at bedside. It is multi-facetted and people are coming together to address this in the a multitude of ways.

Ted Simons:
what would you like it see from lawmakers, from hospitals, what would you like to see as far as helping with this problem?

Kathy Scott:
well, I think the governor has asked the state to be put together a plan to address the healthcare work force shortage. That's a great step in the right direction. I think it will take everyone coming together to look at it from their perspective to put a concerted plan. We'll need fund to go implement that plan.

Ted Simons:
last question here, when we talk about education and we talk about teachers, I here this more and more how the profession of teaching isn't as valid in society as it should be. Do nurses get the respect do you think that they should?

Kathy Scott:
I think there's been a growing respect for nurses as there is more aging population, more chronic disease and more science to learn and more technology. There is a respect for nurses that is pretty universal.

Ted Simons:
and growing you think?

Kathy Scott:
And growing.

Ted Simons:
good luck with this. Thank you for joining us on Horizon.

Kathy Scott:
thank you for having me.

sen. Jake Flake

  |   Video
  • Arizonans mourn the passing of state Senator Jake Flake who died Sunday after suffering a massive heart attack at his home near Snowflake. He was 72. Representative Bill Konopnicki, (R) Safford, joins Horizon to remember Flake and talk about the impact of his work in Arizona.
Guests:
  • Bill Konopnicki - State Representative
Category: Legislature

View Transcript
Ted Simons:
good evening. Welcome to "Horizon." I'm Ted Simons.

Ted Simons:
longtime state senator Jake Flake died on Sunday after a massive heart attack, following a fall at his home near snowFlake, Arizona. The 72-year old lawmaker had been a frequent guest on Horizon over the years. The state legislature remembered him this week. David majure takes a look at senator Flake's career and passing.

Jake Flake:
folks, welcome to the house of representatives.

David Majure:
Arizona state senator Jake Flake was speaker of the house from 2003-2004.

Jake Flake:
thank you and welcome to the house.

David Majure:
he began his legislative career in the house in 1997 and moved to the senate in 2005. Senator Flake was a cattle rancher born and raised in snowFlake a rural Arizona town named after his grandfather. He calls his family the proudest achievement. He and his wife, mary louise had 15 kids and 13 grandkids. A moment of silence honored him and members of the house and senate shared their memories of senator Flake.

Law Maker:
he was a very fair person. There will be a hole down here hard to fill.

Law Maker:
no matter which side of the aisles you were on or your status, he was very kind and affectionate and I definitely will miss him.

Law Maker:
you want to close the chapter on Jake, think of the guy on big horse with a big hat riding off in the sunset. That's the way I want to think about him. Thank you.

Law Maker:
members, I would like to add my own thoughts that senator Flake was a great mentor with me and I will miss him very much. I served with him when he was speaker of the house. He showed tremendous leadership and ability to bring people together and work across the aisles. Rural Arizona particularly lost a friend in Jake. Jake was always a champion for rural Arizona and looked at the state as a whole and moved us forward on very important issues. When people look back, they will say great things happened when he was a speaker of the house and served as a member of the senate.

Ted Simons:
here now to share his memories of senator Jake Flake is representative Bill Konopnicki. Thank you for being here.

Bill Konopnicki:
it's good to be here and talk about Jake Flake.

Ted Simons:
always on the program seemed it be gentleman and friendly and never had the pettiness that we see in some who rise to his level in law.


Bill Konopnicki:
I think that's a very analogy of Jake Flake and rose to the occasion.

Ted Simons:
sometimes you have to be a certain way to get stuff done. Talk about the style of Jake Flake.

Bill Konopnicki:
what Jake brought a very interesting style with him. Of course his ranching background give him a lot of things to draw from. He talked about hurting cows or cats and putting people on perspective. That's the way we worked with people. Take your time and move along and go with the flow and direct them where you want them to have them. It was a very good leadership style. He accomplished many things because of relaxed concerning way of dealing with people.

Ted Simons:
if there's not enough kind of way of dealing with people at the capitol.

Bill Konopnicki:
I don't think so. Unfortunately it's the norm to do the other way than interests of heart. Jake accomplished more than people who have the force-it kind of method.

Ted Simons:
rural Arizona, does this mark a passing for lawmakers that are that entrenched and born in those backgrounds in those era's. Will we see that happen again?

Bill Konopnicki:
I don't think so. The only other is this is a terms of where legislatures and way we work and come from.

Ted Simons:
Arizona chamber commerce quoted that senator Flake's passing makes any bill that's complicated more difficult, do you agree?

Bill Konopnicki:
absolutely. Owe worked to solve the problems. That was his trademark piece and that will be missed. I know he was a co-sponsor of a bill that you are interested and involved in as well. That's the temporary worker bill for Arizona. How does his passing effect that particular piece of legislation?

Ted Simons:
well, Jake was a champion of the bill and he will be miss. Does the slow? What happens here?

Bill Konopnicki:
I think the bill will move forward. We counted on Jake and Jake had a co-sponsor that would have helped to move the bill and we will miss his effort. In his honor we may be able to move the bill forward better than we would have before.

Ted Simons:
in his honor, do you think things like the budget which seems to be moving so slowly and a lot of partisan bickering on both sides. Could there be cooperation coming out of this?

Bill Konopnicki:
I think the passing of our great friend and senator Jake Flake is making us see yes, and try to do the things that Jake would have done.

Ted Simons:
what happens in terms of logistics? Regards to his senate seat?

Bill Konopnicki:
one fill his vacancy for his return and they will recommend three names not board of supervisors. Then the board of supervisors will recommend somebody that would fill his position. That person will fill that spot.

Ted Simons:
likely be a family member, do you think?

Bill Konopnicki:
possibly a family member. There are a few people interested and one person running for the house Sylvia Allen would be a good candidate. It seems a fitting way to wind up Jake's career have his oldest son fill out his term.

Ted Simons:
as far as succeeding in terms, you'll be running for that right?

Bill Konopnicki:
I am. They will select someone and take Jake's place on the ballot.

Ted Simons:
on the ballot for the house?

Bill Konopnicki:
I am. I would have to give up that position in order to accept a position to follow in Jake's place on the senate ballot.

Ted Simons:
and are you ready to do that?

Bill Konopnicki:
I am.

Ted Simons:
last question. What can lawmakers learn from Jake Flake?

Bill Konopnicki:
as you started out from, he was always kind and interested in people and far more than policy. He never took his eye off good policy and looked forwards solving the problem and doing the best for Arizona.

Ted Simons:
thank you for joining us. We appreciate your time and memories.

sharlot Hall Museum

  |   Video
  • Eighty years ago, Sharlot Mabridth Hall began a small museum in the Governor's Mansion in Prescott. Today, the museum offers visitors a look into some of the trials and triumphs of Arizona's historic territorial days. John Langellier, director of the museum, joins HORIZON to tell us about its upcoming 80th anniversary celebration.
Guests:
  • John Langellier - Director, Sharlot Hall Museum


View Transcript
Ted Simons:
80 years ago, Sharlot Mabridth hall began a small museum in the governor's mansion in Prescott, Arizona. It offers today's visitors a look into some of the challenges and triumphs of Arizona's historic territorial days. The museum is preparing to celebrate its 80th anniversary. We will talk more about that in a moment. First, Merry Lucero gives us a tour of the museum and its grounds.

Merry Lucero:
the museum is just a few blocks from press cot's historic downtown courthouse square. It was created in 1928 in when was once the governor's mansion by ms. Sharlot hall initially to house her extensive collection of historic artifacts. Eventually it had diverse mix of her personal articles, items from her library and historical objects.

John Langellier:
from letters and box and photographs to the large objects of the governor's mansion. There could be baskets from the native's people and shards of things broken at ancient Indian dwelling sites. She was very broad stroke in what she collected.

Merry Lucero:
today the museum house as variety of exhibits and has multiple historic buildings around the grounds. It hosts several festivals throughout the year.

John Langellier:
it's a historic park not unlike a colonial Williamsburg. It has excellent collections and fantastic exhibit in the more traditional museum sense. But it has festivals that brings toddlers and elderly and communities from all over the country.

Merry Lucero:
the Sharlot hall museum has a theatrical company where people walk around in character and wears the clothing day. It's learning of the past.

Ted Simons:
here to talk about the Sharlot hall museum and its 80th anniversary is John Langellier, director of the museum. Thanks for joining us. It's good to see you.

John Langellier:
thank you for the audience. These are the people we want to come visit.

Ted Simons:
the Sharlot Hall Museum what does it specialize in.

John Langellier:
it looks at territorial Arizona and focuses on the days of 1912 when we were not in the union yet.

Ted Simons:
this is not just a museum with a billing and that's it. This is not one building.

John Langellier:
no, it's not. We start out modestly the original governor's mansion from 1894. It has grown four acres of a campus, if you will, with a number of out buildings historical in nature. The first individual to run for president of the United States under the republican banner prior to Abraham Lincoln's home and other structures and a center being expanded for more exhibits in the future. And the research center of the graduate school that services tens of thousands of people on line and through the years doing research on the Arizona history and plateau.

Ted Simons:
talk to us about folks thinking of driving up to Prescott for the museum. What will they find?

John Langellier:
they will find it easy to get to. Unlike most of us dealing with traffic. Once there, we're two blocks away from the plaza and famous whiskey row. You can stop and have a burger or something heavier. We have a large structure and people can spend the day going to the shops and stores and restaurants and visiting us on a lush campus that has the much types of area that was found in territorial Arizona. It's park-like atmosphere like going to Williamsburg. Buildings come alive even though they are historical objects they are peopled by people who are providing tours and individuals like myself who is portraying the Governor John Malls himself.

Ted Simons:
when you get visitors, what surprises them the most?

John Langellier:
first of all, they expect something smaller. The name is confusing. Sharlot hall. Her name was not hall. It happened to be her last name. It's a bigger experience than they thought. That's the keyword. It's an experience not just the museum's gallery but collective nature of the buildings and programs. They are extraordinary. We have an creditably talented staff and gifted group of nearly 300 volunteers who make history come alive.

Ted Simons:
who was Sharlot Hall?

John Langellier:
she left in 1870 to come to the wilds of Arizona in 1882 as a ranching daughter. Self-educated, poet, historian and deserved to find the map of Arizona prior to the being the state and decided to include the north rim of the grand canyon. She never married. Her life was the museum. She lived in the historic governor's mansion when it opened in june of 1928 to be the on-hand curator.

Ted Simons:
at what age did she decide to have that as her calling?

John Langellier:
as early as 1909, she was the first female in what would be state government at the highest level at the time or prestate government. Not long after that, she felt we were losing the history and traditions and artifacts of the entire Arizona experience prior to statehood. It was about that time along with Becky O'Neil's widow and then the buildings named after extraordinary women who were her. There were a group of women who were more concerned with the history than the males who were supposedly the makers and shaker.

Ted Simons:
interesting. The challenges of a museum in general and especially one that's on a campus a-grounds as you say, where there's more than one building to take care of talk about a the challenges.

John Langellier:
this day in age we worry about utility and water. We have four acres to maintain and how do you keep it lush garden without a desert-looking situation. Getting people from the valley and Tucson and other places to visit with skyrocketing economy is difficult and people are not traveling around. We are a designation with the greater Prescott area and very much committed of being a designation for tourism and for local family and friends and neighbors and friends in state and out of state. Last year we had visitors from 50 states and 15 foreign countries. We're a state agency and a private-sector enterprise given the state of the budget today in Arizona, we have had draw downs that we have be more economical about doing business smarter and proactive to raise funds to sustain the quality. We are expanding rather than contracting.

Ted Simons:
People can find you on the web?

John Langellier:
The web site is back. www.sharlothall.org. Sharlot is an unusual spelling.

Ted Simons:
we have that on the screen right now Sharlothall.org. Thank you very much, I think this is a museum for folks that are new in Arizona that may be a good day trip.

John Langellier:
this is a good day trip. You can come back in the same night as well.

Ted Simons:
very good. Thank you for joining us.

John Langellier: my pleasure.

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