Horizon, Host: Ted Simons

August 22, 2006


Host: Michael Grant

Celica disease


  • Help for a serious digestive illness that affects people when they eat certain grains and foods.
Guests:
  • Daniel Arreola - Professor of geographical sciences, Arizona State University
  • Paul Blue - Assistant aviation director, Phoenix Sky Harbor


View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on "Horizon," Phoenix is one of three big cities in America where minorities now have become the majority, this identified in newly analyzed census data. Plus, heightened security at Phoenix Sky Harbor airport following this month's discovery in Great Britain of a terrorist plot. And help for a serious digestive illness that affects people when they eat certain grains and foods. Those stories next on "Horizon."

Announcer:
"Horizon" is made possible by contributions from the friends of 8. Members of your Arizona PBS station. Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Good evening. Welcome to Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. The white, non-Hispanic population has now become the minority in Phoenix, Tucson and Denver, according to newly released census data. The U.S. census bureau says more than 30 of the nation's largest 50 cities are predominantly minority where the white population has fallen below 50\%. It says minority populations grew dramatically from 2000 to 2005 in those cities. Here to talk about this phenomenon, causes and trends is Daniel Arreola, a professor with Arizona State University's school of geographical sciences. Daniel, give me the basic data here. What do we know about 2005?

Daniel Arreola:
Right. The data that were released recently are from the U.S. census from the annual updates done on a regular basis to try to give communities and nation a more recent assessment of the population giving the last census was done in 2000. The total population for the city of Phoenix according to this update is 1.4 million. It's 1.377, according to this estimate. Of that the non-white population as classified by the census which includes people of Hispanic, African-American, Asian and other categories ancestry are now the majority of the population of the city of Phoenix.

Michael Grant:
Yeah, we need to clarify here. This is not Phoenix metro.

Daniel Arreola:
Correct.

Michael Grant:
This is not what most of us think of as the valley.

Daniel Arreola:
Correct.

Michael Grant:
It is the city of Phoenix proper.

Daniel Arreola:
City of Phoenix proper. Phoenix is a major city over a million people. The metro area includes all people and residents in Maricopa County and you have roughly 3.5 to 4 million people in the metro area. Phoenix's population is a small percentage. It's dominant center but a percentage of that.

Michael Grant:
Going back to 2000 the Hispanic number in the city of Phoenix, if I recall correctly, was 39\%. That moved up 7 or 8 points up to 42.

Daniel Arreola:
In 2000 it was 31.4\% of the city's population as Hispanic Latino. The 2005 release that came out that's 41.8. Round it up to 42\% of the city of Phoenix's population is Hispanic population which constitutes the largest group of minority.

Michael Grant:
That leaves--to get above 50\% it leaves 8 points for African Americans, Asians.

Daniel Arreola:
Native Americans, pacific islanders.

Michael Grant:
Minority categories. Do we have any indication from the census data--I know you can't ask it on the form. Do we have any indication at all how much of that population--of the Hispanic population would be illegal immigrants?

Daniel Arreola:
There are estimates of course compiled from a variety of sources. The difficulty of assessing the numbers of legality because it can't be asked officially, they are essentially estimates and based on a variety of the measures. One of things the census counts--remember it's a self-declared document. It's sent to people's resident and they have to self-declare what their identity is according to their ancestry and registered data. One of things it asks for is number of people foreign born. In the year 2000, we had a number of foreign born for the city of Phoenix; that was, about a quarter of a million people indicated they were foreign born. That was 20\% of the population of the city of Phoenix. These 2005 data that were just released have foreign born at 311,000 for the city of Phoenix. Percentages are about 23\% of the city population. So foreign born is sometimes used as a measure to indicate something about people that were here. Obviously born in another country and resident in Phoenix and in Arizona.

Michael Grant:
Anything, Daniel, in how people respond to the surveys which could be explaining some elements of this? For example, we were talking before we went on the air about people who perhaps used to in prior census documents declare themselves as white, now declare themselves as mixed race.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes, this is of particular interest to scholars who are researching the evidence from the census. Because in the case of Hispanic Latino population is one of the things that came out in the 2000 census is for the first time you had a large percentage--close to half of the people responded to Hispanic Latino question in the U.S. census and for a nation as a whole declared their ancestry was mixed race. This is different from the census in 1990s and 1980s when the majority of Hispanic Latinos declared their racial affiliation as white. Why are people changing racial affiliation? Part of it has to do with the Hispanic Latino immigrants coming from many parts of Latin America and the world. I think it says something about people's acceptance of multi-racial backgrounds and admittance of admitting that now.

Michael Grant:
Any portion of the growth phenomenon attributable to outreach efforts? Let's face it. Cities and government have interest because a lot of monies are shared based on this data to do more extensive outreach than they used to do.

Daniel Arreola:
Are you speaking of the city's doing specific outreach?

Michael Grant:
Well and also the census bureau itself. I think there's much more emphasis placed now on trying to count every person than perhaps there was 15, 20, 25 years ago.

Daniel Arreola:
Well, the census--I'm not a census expert or a demographer. I suspect they try to upgrade the way they measure. You can try to invite people on the program who know more about census and could give you detailed information. The nature of the way society is accepting diversity and concerned with it and both constitutional level and city governments as well as with the media and society at large, I think make it a much more open declaring process perhaps than it was in the past.

Michael Grant:
I guess what I was trying to struggle with, it's clear that the population is growing. What I'm struggling with is how much of this is real growth and how much of it is newly detected growth? I mean, it's been there. We're just getting better at detecting it and perhaps reporting the way people look at themselves and how they report themselves.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes.

Michael Grant:
Changing as well.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes, I would agree.

Michael Grant:
Daniel, thank you very much for the information. Interesting phenomenon.

Michael Grant:
The U.S. department of homeland security has raised the national threat level at the nation's airports, this following the August 10th announcement of a terrorism plot uncovered in Great Britain that targeted airliners headed to the U.S. officials are expected to continue the alert at least through next month's anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks. In the meantime, airport operations and airline travelers have adjusted, mostly. Merry Lucero spoke with passengers at Sky Harbor airport who had mixed feelings about the new security measures.

Merry Lucero:
Airline passengers go through the security checkpoint as usual with a few changes. Carry-on baggage with no liquids, lotions or gels.

Passenger:
I threw away my toothpaste and deodorant and body wash.

Merry Lucero:
Hope it's a short flight. Most passengers say ditching the toiletries are small price to pay for safety.

Passenger:
I'll pay the extra 10 bucks.

Passenger 2:
It's worth me and not too much trouble.

Merry Lucero:
Some are learning checking bags can make traveling more manageable.

Passenger 3:
I was going to not check my luggage. I'm checked. I have my stuff expect for this stuff checked. Some ways it's easier to check your luggage and travel more easily I guess. I do drink a bunch of water.

Merry Lucero:
No beverages allowed. There are a lot of people downing that last bit of water.

Passenger 4:
It's very frustrating. I'm very thirsty. I have to have water by my side. I don't want to pay $2.25 for a new bottle of water.

Merry Lucero:
Or hurry to finish their latte.

Passenger 5:
I have to throw it away.

Cameraman:
What did they tell you?

Passenger 5:
Get rid of it, in the garbage can. That's all. Not a big deal.

Merry Lucero:
One possible big deal baby formula. This mom is just hoping.

Passenger 6:
That they allow me to bring my baby's formula on the plane.

Merry Lucero:
Crying baby on the plane could be the alternative. Yes. She got the formula on the plane. Medications must be in clear plastic bags or taken before boarding and as luggage rolls in and out of the airport and on and off airplanes, airliners fly in and out of Sky Harbor airport and they adjust for the most part.

Passenger 7:
I miss my lip gloss.

Merry Lucero:
Dry lips.

Michael Grant: J
oining me now with more on the security and operations at the airport: Paul Blue, Assistant Aviation Director at Phoenix Sky Harbor. Most people managing to retain their sense of humor like that lady?

Paul Blue: Michael, we have found that the public has been great. Everyone has really adopted the new requirements that have been set forth. We aren't really finding there's any significant problems.

Michael Grant: There was an absolute ban right off the bat on the liquids thing and then I think they sort of went through, hold it; there's some liquids that we need to allow. Paul, where are we precisely now if I were to go to Sky Harbor tomorrow and may be dumb enough to take a piece of carryon luggage, what should be in there?

Paul Blue: Generally the ban that remains on bringing on the aircraft or coming through the checkpoints are liquids and gels. Gels like shampoos.

Michael Grant: Shaving cream.

Paul Blue: All of those similar kinds of things are not permitted through the checkpoint or on to the aircraft. What we encourage passengers to do is go to tsa.gov or check on their airline's website where they have the up to the date information. You reference that morning there was a ban on everything. TSA is trying to create security and recognizing the needs for passengers and provided relief for baby formulas and for passengers who have medicines.

Michael Grant: Prescription medicines.

Paul Blue: Insulin.

Michael Grant: If your prescription match the name on ticket.

Paul Blue:
Exact lit TSA can provide specific details if they have specific questions on the website if they have a individual circumstances to work through.

Michael Grant:
This week I heard a number of $200,000 in increased costs at Sky Harbor as a result of elevation from yellow to orange. Number 1, is that accurate? Number 2, what does that consist of?

Paul Blue:
I think that was accumulation of 10 days of expenses. We're roughly spending $20,000 a day to respond to the increased threat level as it relates to the airport operator trying to maintain a safe environment. It's additional staffing in the security side of operation in security guards and police officers where the TSA is asked for increased vigilance in various locations and positions throughout the airport. We are supplying more staff and drives overtime. When you supply exciting resources to new locations, clearly you have more work to be done and we have brought in staff to do that.

Michael Grant:
Does the federal government pick it up or the city of Phoenix?

Paul Blue:
The city of Phoenix picks it up and more precise the aviation department picks up the expense. As you know and some folks the general taxpayers don't pay for operations at Sky Harbor. We have to earn all the money, our money that is made at the airport stays at the airport. No financial support from the resources. I think for now we are doing okay. Clearly we're concerned about how do we manage and create a safe environment and but as much as we can reduce the hassle factor for customers.

Michael Grant:
A little bit like Las Vegas what costs here stays here.

Paul Blue:
By all means.

Michael Grant:
What sort of other problems is this causing elsewhere in airport operations? For example, I had heard because more people are checking bags, that is putting a strain on a lot of airlines baggage handling operations.

Paul Blue:
Sure. The amount of luggage has increased that is being checked through the ticketing lobby at Sky Harbor. The airlines have to adjust their staffing levels to accommodate that fact that more people are checking luggage who ordinarily would bypass ticketing, go straight to a kiosk or print off their boarding pass and never go to ticket lobbying. We find that's as high as 50\% that never come to the ticket counter. Same token we are hearing from airline partners the boarding of the aircraft is more smooth and quicker because there's less carryon luggage coming through the checkpoint. It's a trade off. Pay me now pay me later. All and all it's going well.

Michael Grant:
On the carry-ons I know they have been x-rayed of course for a long time. In addition to that are they physically inspected?

Paul Blue:
There are on random basis inspections that can occur once you're out on the concourse in the gate room, gate hold area. Again observe the tsa.gov website and provide passengers with the up to the minute protocol with TSA what passengers should expect.

Michael Grant:
I was driving at when you pass through the actual security checkpoint itself obviously the stuff is x-rayed and occasionally physically inspected. I wasn't sure if it's routinely the bag being opened and looked at.

Paul Blue:
The TSA has a variety of additional procedures they are applying. They are trying not to be precise about how and when they do everything. It's part of their security protocols to provide extra major security. Some things happen additional at the checkpoints. Some things may happen at the hold rooms. You won't see it everyone time. The reason is they are trying to have the highest security. Not sharing precisely what the protocols are as they wait to create the greatest benefit that they can.

Michael Grant:
If you are traveling out of the country do you need to make--I mean really pay special attention particularly if you are going to the United Kingdom.

Paul Blue:
Especially to the United Kingdom. We encourage the customers to check the airline website to find out specific requirements that individual airlines have about checked luggage and carry-on luggage and how early to show up. We found most customers have been able to deal with the changes. The UK has special requirements as far as coming and going. The British authorities are evaluating the threats as the TSA is evaluating the threats. They are doing the best extent they can to the greatest degree of security and minimize the hassle factor so the customers have great experience.

Michael Grant:
Different requirements for example going into London than coming out on the other hand depending on how you travel in, that may dictate how you travel out.

Paul Blue:
Right and again that on British air ways they have some requirements that are unique to British air ways. Not about security but about baggage. Check with your airline. They can provide you the best up to minute information with specific requirement and travel well.

Michael Grant:
Paul, putting all this stuff together has delays been worst in the past couple of weeks or not.

Paul Blue:
You know, Thursday morning through midday of the new security directives coming out there were some strong lines in the building. We will tell you by Thursday afternoon, we were back to normal at the checkpoints and by the weekend, the ticketing lobbies were back to normal. What we found most gratifying is the public understands why we need to do this and they responded. So when you saw the pictures and images of products need to be discarded at the checkpoints. That he was very heavy Thursday, Friday. We're down to very minimal amounts of that. The public accepted that and participated in it and joining in to help make it safe and easy.

Michael Grant:
All right. Paul Blue from Sky Harbor. We appreciate the information.

Paul Blue:
Thanks.

Michael Grant:
Imagine not being able to eat many foods most people enjoy: breads, pastas, cookies, even soy sauce. That is what people with celiac disease face. The illness used to be considered a rare disease but not anymore. Unfortunately, as Pam White reports, many of people are still undiagnosed.

Pam White:
Colleen has a lot in common with a famous family member.

Colleen Bedeman:
My uncle is Gene Kelly of "Singing in the Rain" and my father was Fred Kelly of Broadway which is where I grew up. I've been performing since I was a year old. It comes naturally, but I enjoy the teaching aspect best.

Pam White:
She inherited a love for show business but she inherited something else. Fortunately nothing else someone in the immediate family shares. It's called celiac disease.

Colleen Bedeman:
Wheat to a celiac is a carcinogen. At some point it wipes out your intestinal tract.

Pam White:
It damages the small intestine. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

Melissa Diane Smith:
Barley, wheats and oats and additives. It's hidden in common food products from soy sauce to some teas.

Pam White:
Melissa Diane Smith is a nutritional counselor, health educator and author of "Going Against the Grain."

Melissa Diane Smith:
The body reacts so strongly to gluten, protein and wheat and other common grains that it actually starts to destroy the normal brush-like lining of the small intestine.

Pam White:
Smith says celiac disease can be difficult to detect because it presents from migraines to gastrointestinal disorders. Today there are much easier ways to test for it.

Melissa Diane Smith:
There are blood tests recently made available that test your body's immune response or the anti-bodies it produces to gluten.

Pam White:
Celiac disease is not a reaction like lactose intolerance. If left untreated, it can manifest into serious problems.

Melissa Diane Smith:
One is the longer a person with celiac disease keeps eating gluten and undiagnosed, the more they can develop autoimmune diseases. It could be thyroid and liver or rheumatoid arthritis. You could actually get autoimmune diseases.

Pam White:
She didn't have obviously symptoms for years until something triggered her and almost killed her.

Colleen Bedeman:
I could eat three spaghetti dinners and a loaf of garlic bread and ask for a dessert menu. It wiped out my intestinal track and I was dieing of malnutrition. That's when they decided something had to be done and try this bizarre diet.

Pam White:
For 23 years she's been on a gluten-free diet. A diet that's easier to follow because of new products and improved labeling. But she still has to watch out.

Colleen Bedeman:
My children grew up knowing if they put the knife in the mayonnaise jar and wipe it on the bread it does not go back in the jar or it contaminates the mayonnaise.

Pam White:
In a recent study the perception that celiac disease is rare is changing. In fact it's estimated 1 in every 250 people in the U.S. has it.

Melissa Diane Smith:
Doctors originally when they went through training were taught it's very rare occurring in one in 7,000 people or something like that. It turns out that these newly developed blood tests have been able to show that it's much more common than anybody ever realized.

Pam White:
Cause is unknown but there is a treatment, a gluten-free diet. So Smith and Bedeman are trying to raise awareness to encourage early detection and prevention.

Colleen Bedeman:
We want to put together a booklet to give to the doctors so they can understand how simple diagnoses can be and the testing is no longer the big expense.

Melissa Diane Smith:
I think it's important when people have unexplained illness, to think about this, to get the idea that grains might not always be good for every person.

Larry Lemmons:
Democratic senatorial candidate Jim Pederson will talk about where he stands on the issues on the campaign with the seat with Jon Kyl and changes these Election Day and hand counts for electronic voting in remedy for long lines.

Michael Grant:
And next following Horizon, stay tuned for "Arizona stories". Among tonight's stories: La Posada, Frank Luke, and. St. Mary's Basilica. "Arizona stories," tales of our unique people, places and history airs every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. thanks for joining us this evening. I'm Michael Grant. Have a great one. Good night.

New census date on minority population


  • Phoenix is one of three big cities in America where minorities now have become the majority, this identified in newly analyzed census data.
Guests:
  • Daniel Arreola - Professor of geographical sciences, Arizona State University
  • Paul Blue - Assistant aviation director, Phoenix Sky Harbor


View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on "Horizon," Phoenix is one of three big cities in America where minorities now have become the majority, this identified in newly analyzed census data. Plus, heightened security at Phoenix Sky Harbor airport following this month's discovery in Great Britain of a terrorist plot. And help for a serious digestive illness that affects people when they eat certain grains and foods. Those stories next on "Horizon."

Announcer:
"Horizon" is made possible by contributions from the friends of 8. Members of your Arizona PBS station. Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Good evening. Welcome to Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. The white, non-Hispanic population has now become the minority in Phoenix, Tucson and Denver, according to newly released census data. The U.S. census bureau says more than 30 of the nation's largest 50 cities are predominantly minority where the white population has fallen below 50\%. It says minority populations grew dramatically from 2000 to 2005 in those cities. Here to talk about this phenomenon, causes and trends is Daniel Arreola, a professor with Arizona State University's school of geographical sciences. Daniel, give me the basic data here. What do we know about 2005?

Daniel Arreola:
Right. The data that were released recently are from the U.S. census from the annual updates done on a regular basis to try to give communities and nation a more recent assessment of the population giving the last census was done in 2000. The total population for the city of Phoenix according to this update is 1.4 million. It's 1.377, according to this estimate. Of that the non-white population as classified by the census which includes people of Hispanic, African-American, Asian and other categories ancestry are now the majority of the population of the city of Phoenix.

Michael Grant:
Yeah, we need to clarify here. This is not Phoenix metro.

Daniel Arreola:
Correct.

Michael Grant:
This is not what most of us think of as the valley.

Daniel Arreola:
Correct.

Michael Grant:
It is the city of Phoenix proper.

Daniel Arreola:
City of Phoenix proper. Phoenix is a major city over a million people. The metro area includes all people and residents in Maricopa County and you have roughly 3.5 to 4 million people in the metro area. Phoenix's population is a small percentage. It's dominant center but a percentage of that.

Michael Grant:
Going back to 2000 the Hispanic number in the city of Phoenix, if I recall correctly, was 39\%. That moved up 7 or 8 points up to 42.

Daniel Arreola:
In 2000 it was 31.4\% of the city's population as Hispanic Latino. The 2005 release that came out that's 41.8. Round it up to 42\% of the city of Phoenix's population is Hispanic population which constitutes the largest group of minority.

Michael Grant:
That leaves--to get above 50\% it leaves 8 points for African Americans, Asians.

Daniel Arreola:
Native Americans, pacific islanders.

Michael Grant:
Minority categories. Do we have any indication from the census data--I know you can't ask it on the form. Do we have any indication at all how much of that population--of the Hispanic population would be illegal immigrants?

Daniel Arreola:
There are estimates of course compiled from a variety of sources. The difficulty of assessing the numbers of legality because it can't be asked officially, they are essentially estimates and based on a variety of the measures. One of things the census counts--remember it's a self-declared document. It's sent to people's resident and they have to self-declare what their identity is according to their ancestry and registered data. One of things it asks for is number of people foreign born. In the year 2000, we had a number of foreign born for the city of Phoenix; that was, about a quarter of a million people indicated they were foreign born. That was 20\% of the population of the city of Phoenix. These 2005 data that were just released have foreign born at 311,000 for the city of Phoenix. Percentages are about 23\% of the city population. So foreign born is sometimes used as a measure to indicate something about people that were here. Obviously born in another country and resident in Phoenix and in Arizona.

Michael Grant:
Anything, Daniel, in how people respond to the surveys which could be explaining some elements of this? For example, we were talking before we went on the air about people who perhaps used to in prior census documents declare themselves as white, now declare themselves as mixed race.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes, this is of particular interest to scholars who are researching the evidence from the census. Because in the case of Hispanic Latino population is one of the things that came out in the 2000 census is for the first time you had a large percentage--close to half of the people responded to Hispanic Latino question in the U.S. census and for a nation as a whole declared their ancestry was mixed race. This is different from the census in 1990s and 1980s when the majority of Hispanic Latinos declared their racial affiliation as white. Why are people changing racial affiliation? Part of it has to do with the Hispanic Latino immigrants coming from many parts of Latin America and the world. I think it says something about people's acceptance of multi-racial backgrounds and admittance of admitting that now.

Michael Grant:
Any portion of the growth phenomenon attributable to outreach efforts? Let's face it. Cities and government have interest because a lot of monies are shared based on this data to do more extensive outreach than they used to do.

Daniel Arreola:
Are you speaking of the city's doing specific outreach?

Michael Grant:
Well and also the census bureau itself. I think there's much more emphasis placed now on trying to count every person than perhaps there was 15, 20, 25 years ago.

Daniel Arreola:
Well, the census--I'm not a census expert or a demographer. I suspect they try to upgrade the way they measure. You can try to invite people on the program who know more about census and could give you detailed information. The nature of the way society is accepting diversity and concerned with it and both constitutional level and city governments as well as with the media and society at large, I think make it a much more open declaring process perhaps than it was in the past.

Michael Grant:
I guess what I was trying to struggle with, it's clear that the population is growing. What I'm struggling with is how much of this is real growth and how much of it is newly detected growth? I mean, it's been there. We're just getting better at detecting it and perhaps reporting the way people look at themselves and how they report themselves.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes.

Michael Grant:
Changing as well.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes, I would agree.

Michael Grant:
Daniel, thank you very much for the information. Interesting phenomenon.

Michael Grant:
The U.S. department of homeland security has raised the national threat level at the nation's airports, this following the August 10th announcement of a terrorism plot uncovered in Great Britain that targeted airliners headed to the U.S. officials are expected to continue the alert at least through next month's anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks. In the meantime, airport operations and airline travelers have adjusted, mostly. Merry Lucero spoke with passengers at Sky Harbor airport who had mixed feelings about the new security measures.

Merry Lucero:
Airline passengers go through the security checkpoint as usual with a few changes. Carry-on baggage with no liquids, lotions or gels.

Passenger:
I threw away my toothpaste and deodorant and body wash.

Merry Lucero:
Hope it's a short flight. Most passengers say ditching the toiletries are small price to pay for safety.

Passenger:
I'll pay the extra 10 bucks.

Passenger 2:
It's worth me and not too much trouble.

Merry Lucero:
Some are learning checking bags can make traveling more manageable.

Passenger 3:
I was going to not check my luggage. I'm checked. I have my stuff expect for this stuff checked. Some ways it's easier to check your luggage and travel more easily I guess. I do drink a bunch of water.

Merry Lucero:
No beverages allowed. There are a lot of people downing that last bit of water.

Passenger 4:
It's very frustrating. I'm very thirsty. I have to have water by my side. I don't want to pay $2.25 for a new bottle of water.

Merry Lucero:
Or hurry to finish their latte.

Passenger 5:
I have to throw it away.

Cameraman:
What did they tell you?

Passenger 5:
Get rid of it, in the garbage can. That's all. Not a big deal.

Merry Lucero:
One possible big deal baby formula. This mom is just hoping.

Passenger 6:
That they allow me to bring my baby's formula on the plane.

Merry Lucero:
Crying baby on the plane could be the alternative. Yes. She got the formula on the plane. Medications must be in clear plastic bags or taken before boarding and as luggage rolls in and out of the airport and on and off airplanes, airliners fly in and out of Sky Harbor airport and they adjust for the most part.

Passenger 7:
I miss my lip gloss.

Merry Lucero:
Dry lips.

Michael Grant: J
oining me now with more on the security and operations at the airport: Paul Blue, Assistant Aviation Director at Phoenix Sky Harbor. Most people managing to retain their sense of humor like that lady?

Paul Blue: Michael, we have found that the public has been great. Everyone has really adopted the new requirements that have been set forth. We aren't really finding there's any significant problems.

Michael Grant: There was an absolute ban right off the bat on the liquids thing and then I think they sort of went through, hold it; there's some liquids that we need to allow. Paul, where are we precisely now if I were to go to Sky Harbor tomorrow and may be dumb enough to take a piece of carryon luggage, what should be in there?

Paul Blue: Generally the ban that remains on bringing on the aircraft or coming through the checkpoints are liquids and gels. Gels like shampoos.

Michael Grant: Shaving cream.

Paul Blue: All of those similar kinds of things are not permitted through the checkpoint or on to the aircraft. What we encourage passengers to do is go to tsa.gov or check on their airline's website where they have the up to the date information. You reference that morning there was a ban on everything. TSA is trying to create security and recognizing the needs for passengers and provided relief for baby formulas and for passengers who have medicines.

Michael Grant: Prescription medicines.

Paul Blue: Insulin.

Michael Grant: If your prescription match the name on ticket.

Paul Blue:
Exact lit TSA can provide specific details if they have specific questions on the website if they have a individual circumstances to work through.

Michael Grant:
This week I heard a number of $200,000 in increased costs at Sky Harbor as a result of elevation from yellow to orange. Number 1, is that accurate? Number 2, what does that consist of?

Paul Blue:
I think that was accumulation of 10 days of expenses. We're roughly spending $20,000 a day to respond to the increased threat level as it relates to the airport operator trying to maintain a safe environment. It's additional staffing in the security side of operation in security guards and police officers where the TSA is asked for increased vigilance in various locations and positions throughout the airport. We are supplying more staff and drives overtime. When you supply exciting resources to new locations, clearly you have more work to be done and we have brought in staff to do that.

Michael Grant:
Does the federal government pick it up or the city of Phoenix?

Paul Blue:
The city of Phoenix picks it up and more precise the aviation department picks up the expense. As you know and some folks the general taxpayers don't pay for operations at Sky Harbor. We have to earn all the money, our money that is made at the airport stays at the airport. No financial support from the resources. I think for now we are doing okay. Clearly we're concerned about how do we manage and create a safe environment and but as much as we can reduce the hassle factor for customers.

Michael Grant:
A little bit like Las Vegas what costs here stays here.

Paul Blue:
By all means.

Michael Grant:
What sort of other problems is this causing elsewhere in airport operations? For example, I had heard because more people are checking bags, that is putting a strain on a lot of airlines baggage handling operations.

Paul Blue:
Sure. The amount of luggage has increased that is being checked through the ticketing lobby at Sky Harbor. The airlines have to adjust their staffing levels to accommodate that fact that more people are checking luggage who ordinarily would bypass ticketing, go straight to a kiosk or print off their boarding pass and never go to ticket lobbying. We find that's as high as 50\% that never come to the ticket counter. Same token we are hearing from airline partners the boarding of the aircraft is more smooth and quicker because there's less carryon luggage coming through the checkpoint. It's a trade off. Pay me now pay me later. All and all it's going well.

Michael Grant:
On the carry-ons I know they have been x-rayed of course for a long time. In addition to that are they physically inspected?

Paul Blue:
There are on random basis inspections that can occur once you're out on the concourse in the gate room, gate hold area. Again observe the tsa.gov website and provide passengers with the up to the minute protocol with TSA what passengers should expect.

Michael Grant:
I was driving at when you pass through the actual security checkpoint itself obviously the stuff is x-rayed and occasionally physically inspected. I wasn't sure if it's routinely the bag being opened and looked at.

Paul Blue:
The TSA has a variety of additional procedures they are applying. They are trying not to be precise about how and when they do everything. It's part of their security protocols to provide extra major security. Some things happen additional at the checkpoints. Some things may happen at the hold rooms. You won't see it everyone time. The reason is they are trying to have the highest security. Not sharing precisely what the protocols are as they wait to create the greatest benefit that they can.

Michael Grant:
If you are traveling out of the country do you need to make--I mean really pay special attention particularly if you are going to the United Kingdom.

Paul Blue:
Especially to the United Kingdom. We encourage the customers to check the airline website to find out specific requirements that individual airlines have about checked luggage and carry-on luggage and how early to show up. We found most customers have been able to deal with the changes. The UK has special requirements as far as coming and going. The British authorities are evaluating the threats as the TSA is evaluating the threats. They are doing the best extent they can to the greatest degree of security and minimize the hassle factor so the customers have great experience.

Michael Grant:
Different requirements for example going into London than coming out on the other hand depending on how you travel in, that may dictate how you travel out.

Paul Blue:
Right and again that on British air ways they have some requirements that are unique to British air ways. Not about security but about baggage. Check with your airline. They can provide you the best up to minute information with specific requirement and travel well.

Michael Grant:
Paul, putting all this stuff together has delays been worst in the past couple of weeks or not.

Paul Blue:
You know, Thursday morning through midday of the new security directives coming out there were some strong lines in the building. We will tell you by Thursday afternoon, we were back to normal at the checkpoints and by the weekend, the ticketing lobbies were back to normal. What we found most gratifying is the public understands why we need to do this and they responded. So when you saw the pictures and images of products need to be discarded at the checkpoints. That he was very heavy Thursday, Friday. We're down to very minimal amounts of that. The public accepted that and participated in it and joining in to help make it safe and easy.

Michael Grant:
All right. Paul Blue from Sky Harbor. We appreciate the information.

Paul Blue:
Thanks.

Michael Grant:
Imagine not being able to eat many foods most people enjoy: breads, pastas, cookies, even soy sauce. That is what people with celiac disease face. The illness used to be considered a rare disease but not anymore. Unfortunately, as Pam White reports, many of people are still undiagnosed.

Pam White:
Colleen has a lot in common with a famous family member.

Colleen Bedeman:
My uncle is Gene Kelly of "Singing in the Rain" and my father was Fred Kelly of Broadway which is where I grew up. I've been performing since I was a year old. It comes naturally, but I enjoy the teaching aspect best.

Pam White:
She inherited a love for show business but she inherited something else. Fortunately nothing else someone in the immediate family shares. It's called celiac disease.

Colleen Bedeman:
Wheat to a celiac is a carcinogen. At some point it wipes out your intestinal tract.

Pam White:
It damages the small intestine. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

Melissa Diane Smith:
Barley, wheats and oats and additives. It's hidden in common food products from soy sauce to some teas.

Pam White:
Melissa Diane Smith is a nutritional counselor, health educator and author of "Going Against the Grain."

Melissa Diane Smith:
The body reacts so strongly to gluten, protein and wheat and other common grains that it actually starts to destroy the normal brush-like lining of the small intestine.

Pam White:
Smith says celiac disease can be difficult to detect because it presents from migraines to gastrointestinal disorders. Today there are much easier ways to test for it.

Melissa Diane Smith:
There are blood tests recently made available that test your body's immune response or the anti-bodies it produces to gluten.

Pam White:
Celiac disease is not a reaction like lactose intolerance. If left untreated, it can manifest into serious problems.

Melissa Diane Smith:
One is the longer a person with celiac disease keeps eating gluten and undiagnosed, the more they can develop autoimmune diseases. It could be thyroid and liver or rheumatoid arthritis. You could actually get autoimmune diseases.

Pam White:
She didn't have obviously symptoms for years until something triggered her and almost killed her.

Colleen Bedeman:
I could eat three spaghetti dinners and a loaf of garlic bread and ask for a dessert menu. It wiped out my intestinal track and I was dieing of malnutrition. That's when they decided something had to be done and try this bizarre diet.

Pam White:
For 23 years she's been on a gluten-free diet. A diet that's easier to follow because of new products and improved labeling. But she still has to watch out.

Colleen Bedeman:
My children grew up knowing if they put the knife in the mayonnaise jar and wipe it on the bread it does not go back in the jar or it contaminates the mayonnaise.

Pam White:
In a recent study the perception that celiac disease is rare is changing. In fact it's estimated 1 in every 250 people in the U.S. has it.

Melissa Diane Smith:
Doctors originally when they went through training were taught it's very rare occurring in one in 7,000 people or something like that. It turns out that these newly developed blood tests have been able to show that it's much more common than anybody ever realized.

Pam White:
Cause is unknown but there is a treatment, a gluten-free diet. So Smith and Bedeman are trying to raise awareness to encourage early detection and prevention.

Colleen Bedeman:
We want to put together a booklet to give to the doctors so they can understand how simple diagnoses can be and the testing is no longer the big expense.

Melissa Diane Smith:
I think it's important when people have unexplained illness, to think about this, to get the idea that grains might not always be good for every person.

Larry Lemmons:
Democratic senatorial candidate Jim Pederson will talk about where he stands on the issues on the campaign with the seat with Jon Kyl and changes these Election Day and hand counts for electronic voting in remedy for long lines.

Michael Grant:
And next following Horizon, stay tuned for "Arizona stories". Among tonight's stories: La Posada, Frank Luke, and. St. Mary's Basilica. "Arizona stories," tales of our unique people, places and history airs every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. thanks for joining us this evening. I'm Michael Grant. Have a great one. Good night.

sky Harbor Security


  • There are some new restrictions for airline passengers related to the terrorism plot uncovered on August 9. British law enforcement made multiple arrests on suspicion of plotting to blow up passenger planes. The alleged plan was to simultaneously blow up several aircraft heading to the United States using benign liquids to make an explosive. For that reason, the U.S. Government raised the nationís threat level and is prohibiting any liquids, including beverages, gels, and lotions from being carried onto airplanes. What does this mean in terms of security at Sky Harbor Airport? Paul Blue, Assistant Aviation Director at Sky Harbor Airport joins HORIZON.
Guests:
  • Daniel Arreola - Professor of geographical sciences, Arizona State University
  • Paul Blue - Assistant aviation director, Phoenix Sky Harbor


View Transcript
Michael Grant:
Tonight on "Horizon," Phoenix is one of three big cities in America where minorities now have become the majority, this identified in newly analyzed census data. Plus, heightened security at Phoenix Sky Harbor airport following this month's discovery in Great Britain of a terrorist plot. And help for a serious digestive illness that affects people when they eat certain grains and foods. Those stories next on "Horizon."

Announcer:
"Horizon" is made possible by contributions from the friends of 8. Members of your Arizona PBS station. Thank you.

Michael Grant:
Good evening. Welcome to Horizon. I'm Michael Grant. The white, non-Hispanic population has now become the minority in Phoenix, Tucson and Denver, according to newly released census data. The U.S. census bureau says more than 30 of the nation's largest 50 cities are predominantly minority where the white population has fallen below 50\%. It says minority populations grew dramatically from 2000 to 2005 in those cities. Here to talk about this phenomenon, causes and trends is Daniel Arreola, a professor with Arizona State University's school of geographical sciences. Daniel, give me the basic data here. What do we know about 2005?

Daniel Arreola:
Right. The data that were released recently are from the U.S. census from the annual updates done on a regular basis to try to give communities and nation a more recent assessment of the population giving the last census was done in 2000. The total population for the city of Phoenix according to this update is 1.4 million. It's 1.377, according to this estimate. Of that the non-white population as classified by the census which includes people of Hispanic, African-American, Asian and other categories ancestry are now the majority of the population of the city of Phoenix.

Michael Grant:
Yeah, we need to clarify here. This is not Phoenix metro.

Daniel Arreola:
Correct.

Michael Grant:
This is not what most of us think of as the valley.

Daniel Arreola:
Correct.

Michael Grant:
It is the city of Phoenix proper.

Daniel Arreola:
City of Phoenix proper. Phoenix is a major city over a million people. The metro area includes all people and residents in Maricopa County and you have roughly 3.5 to 4 million people in the metro area. Phoenix's population is a small percentage. It's dominant center but a percentage of that.

Michael Grant:
Going back to 2000 the Hispanic number in the city of Phoenix, if I recall correctly, was 39\%. That moved up 7 or 8 points up to 42.

Daniel Arreola:
In 2000 it was 31.4\% of the city's population as Hispanic Latino. The 2005 release that came out that's 41.8. Round it up to 42\% of the city of Phoenix's population is Hispanic population which constitutes the largest group of minority.

Michael Grant:
That leaves--to get above 50\% it leaves 8 points for African Americans, Asians.

Daniel Arreola:
Native Americans, pacific islanders.

Michael Grant:
Minority categories. Do we have any indication from the census data--I know you can't ask it on the form. Do we have any indication at all how much of that population--of the Hispanic population would be illegal immigrants?

Daniel Arreola:
There are estimates of course compiled from a variety of sources. The difficulty of assessing the numbers of legality because it can't be asked officially, they are essentially estimates and based on a variety of the measures. One of things the census counts--remember it's a self-declared document. It's sent to people's resident and they have to self-declare what their identity is according to their ancestry and registered data. One of things it asks for is number of people foreign born. In the year 2000, we had a number of foreign born for the city of Phoenix; that was, about a quarter of a million people indicated they were foreign born. That was 20\% of the population of the city of Phoenix. These 2005 data that were just released have foreign born at 311,000 for the city of Phoenix. Percentages are about 23\% of the city population. So foreign born is sometimes used as a measure to indicate something about people that were here. Obviously born in another country and resident in Phoenix and in Arizona.

Michael Grant:
Anything, Daniel, in how people respond to the surveys which could be explaining some elements of this? For example, we were talking before we went on the air about people who perhaps used to in prior census documents declare themselves as white, now declare themselves as mixed race.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes, this is of particular interest to scholars who are researching the evidence from the census. Because in the case of Hispanic Latino population is one of the things that came out in the 2000 census is for the first time you had a large percentage--close to half of the people responded to Hispanic Latino question in the U.S. census and for a nation as a whole declared their ancestry was mixed race. This is different from the census in 1990s and 1980s when the majority of Hispanic Latinos declared their racial affiliation as white. Why are people changing racial affiliation? Part of it has to do with the Hispanic Latino immigrants coming from many parts of Latin America and the world. I think it says something about people's acceptance of multi-racial backgrounds and admittance of admitting that now.

Michael Grant:
Any portion of the growth phenomenon attributable to outreach efforts? Let's face it. Cities and government have interest because a lot of monies are shared based on this data to do more extensive outreach than they used to do.

Daniel Arreola:
Are you speaking of the city's doing specific outreach?

Michael Grant:
Well and also the census bureau itself. I think there's much more emphasis placed now on trying to count every person than perhaps there was 15, 20, 25 years ago.

Daniel Arreola:
Well, the census--I'm not a census expert or a demographer. I suspect they try to upgrade the way they measure. You can try to invite people on the program who know more about census and could give you detailed information. The nature of the way society is accepting diversity and concerned with it and both constitutional level and city governments as well as with the media and society at large, I think make it a much more open declaring process perhaps than it was in the past.

Michael Grant:
I guess what I was trying to struggle with, it's clear that the population is growing. What I'm struggling with is how much of this is real growth and how much of it is newly detected growth? I mean, it's been there. We're just getting better at detecting it and perhaps reporting the way people look at themselves and how they report themselves.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes.

Michael Grant:
Changing as well.

Daniel Arreola:
Yes, I would agree.

Michael Grant:
Daniel, thank you very much for the information. Interesting phenomenon.

Michael Grant:
The U.S. department of homeland security has raised the national threat level at the nation's airports, this following the August 10th announcement of a terrorism plot uncovered in Great Britain that targeted airliners headed to the U.S. officials are expected to continue the alert at least through next month's anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks. In the meantime, airport operations and airline travelers have adjusted, mostly. Merry Lucero spoke with passengers at Sky Harbor airport who had mixed feelings about the new security measures.

Merry Lucero:
Airline passengers go through the security checkpoint as usual with a few changes. Carry-on baggage with no liquids, lotions or gels.

Passenger:
I threw away my toothpaste and deodorant and body wash.

Merry Lucero:
Hope it's a short flight. Most passengers say ditching the toiletries are small price to pay for safety.

Passenger:
I'll pay the extra 10 bucks.

Passenger 2:
It's worth me and not too much trouble.

Merry Lucero:
Some are learning checking bags can make traveling more manageable.

Passenger 3:
I was going to not check my luggage. I'm checked. I have my stuff expect for this stuff checked. Some ways it's easier to check your luggage and travel more easily I guess. I do drink a bunch of water.

Merry Lucero:
No beverages allowed. There are a lot of people downing that last bit of water.

Passenger 4:
It's very frustrating. I'm very thirsty. I have to have water by my side. I don't want to pay $2.25 for a new bottle of water.

Merry Lucero:
Or hurry to finish their latte.

Passenger 5:
I have to throw it away.

Cameraman:
What did they tell you?

Passenger 5:
Get rid of it, in the garbage can. That's all. Not a big deal.

Merry Lucero:
One possible big deal baby formula. This mom is just hoping.

Passenger 6:
That they allow me to bring my baby's formula on the plane.

Merry Lucero:
Crying baby on the plane could be the alternative. Yes. She got the formula on the plane. Medications must be in clear plastic bags or taken before boarding and as luggage rolls in and out of the airport and on and off airplanes, airliners fly in and out of Sky Harbor airport and they adjust for the most part.

Passenger 7:
I miss my lip gloss.

Merry Lucero:
Dry lips.

Michael Grant: J
oining me now with more on the security and operations at the airport: Paul Blue, Assistant Aviation Director at Phoenix Sky Harbor. Most people managing to retain their sense of humor like that lady?

Paul Blue: Michael, we have found that the public has been great. Everyone has really adopted the new requirements that have been set forth. We aren't really finding there's any significant problems.

Michael Grant: There was an absolute ban right off the bat on the liquids thing and then I think they sort of went through, hold it; there's some liquids that we need to allow. Paul, where are we precisely now if I were to go to Sky Harbor tomorrow and may be dumb enough to take a piece of carryon luggage, what should be in there?

Paul Blue: Generally the ban that remains on bringing on the aircraft or coming through the checkpoints are liquids and gels. Gels like shampoos.

Michael Grant: Shaving cream.

Paul Blue: All of those similar kinds of things are not permitted through the checkpoint or on to the aircraft. What we encourage passengers to do is go to tsa.gov or check on their airline's website where they have the up to the date information. You reference that morning there was a ban on everything. TSA is trying to create security and recognizing the needs for passengers and provided relief for baby formulas and for passengers who have medicines.

Michael Grant: Prescription medicines.

Paul Blue: Insulin.

Michael Grant: If your prescription match the name on ticket.

Paul Blue:
Exact lit TSA can provide specific details if they have specific questions on the website if they have a individual circumstances to work through.

Michael Grant:
This week I heard a number of $200,000 in increased costs at Sky Harbor as a result of elevation from yellow to orange. Number 1, is that accurate? Number 2, what does that consist of?

Paul Blue:
I think that was accumulation of 10 days of expenses. We're roughly spending $20,000 a day to respond to the increased threat level as it relates to the airport operator trying to maintain a safe environment. It's additional staffing in the security side of operation in security guards and police officers where the TSA is asked for increased vigilance in various locations and positions throughout the airport. We are supplying more staff and drives overtime. When you supply exciting resources to new locations, clearly you have more work to be done and we have brought in staff to do that.

Michael Grant:
Does the federal government pick it up or the city of Phoenix?

Paul Blue:
The city of Phoenix picks it up and more precise the aviation department picks up the expense. As you know and some folks the general taxpayers don't pay for operations at Sky Harbor. We have to earn all the money, our money that is made at the airport stays at the airport. No financial support from the resources. I think for now we are doing okay. Clearly we're concerned about how do we manage and create a safe environment and but as much as we can reduce the hassle factor for customers.

Michael Grant:
A little bit like Las Vegas what costs here stays here.

Paul Blue:
By all means.

Michael Grant:
What sort of other problems is this causing elsewhere in airport operations? For example, I had heard because more people are checking bags, that is putting a strain on a lot of airlines baggage handling operations.

Paul Blue:
Sure. The amount of luggage has increased that is being checked through the ticketing lobby at Sky Harbor. The airlines have to adjust their staffing levels to accommodate that fact that more people are checking luggage who ordinarily would bypass ticketing, go straight to a kiosk or print off their boarding pass and never go to ticket lobbying. We find that's as high as 50\% that never come to the ticket counter. Same token we are hearing from airline partners the boarding of the aircraft is more smooth and quicker because there's less carryon luggage coming through the checkpoint. It's a trade off. Pay me now pay me later. All and all it's going well.

Michael Grant:
On the carry-ons I know they have been x-rayed of course for a long time. In addition to that are they physically inspected?

Paul Blue:
There are on random basis inspections that can occur once you're out on the concourse in the gate room, gate hold area. Again observe the tsa.gov website and provide passengers with the up to the minute protocol with TSA what passengers should expect.

Michael Grant:
I was driving at when you pass through the actual security checkpoint itself obviously the stuff is x-rayed and occasionally physically inspected. I wasn't sure if it's routinely the bag being opened and looked at.

Paul Blue:
The TSA has a variety of additional procedures they are applying. They are trying not to be precise about how and when they do everything. It's part of their security protocols to provide extra major security. Some things happen additional at the checkpoints. Some things may happen at the hold rooms. You won't see it everyone time. The reason is they are trying to have the highest security. Not sharing precisely what the protocols are as they wait to create the greatest benefit that they can.

Michael Grant:
If you are traveling out of the country do you need to make--I mean really pay special attention particularly if you are going to the United Kingdom.

Paul Blue:
Especially to the United Kingdom. We encourage the customers to check the airline website to find out specific requirements that individual airlines have about checked luggage and carry-on luggage and how early to show up. We found most customers have been able to deal with the changes. The UK has special requirements as far as coming and going. The British authorities are evaluating the threats as the TSA is evaluating the threats. They are doing the best extent they can to the greatest degree of security and minimize the hassle factor so the customers have great experience.

Michael Grant:
Different requirements for example going into London than coming out on the other hand depending on how you travel in, that may dictate how you travel out.

Paul Blue:
Right and again that on British air ways they have some requirements that are unique to British air ways. Not about security but about baggage. Check with your airline. They can provide you the best up to minute information with specific requirement and travel well.

Michael Grant:
Paul, putting all this stuff together has delays been worst in the past couple of weeks or not.

Paul Blue:
You know, Thursday morning through midday of the new security directives coming out there were some strong lines in the building. We will tell you by Thursday afternoon, we were back to normal at the checkpoints and by the weekend, the ticketing lobbies were back to normal. What we found most gratifying is the public understands why we need to do this and they responded. So when you saw the pictures and images of products need to be discarded at the checkpoints. That he was very heavy Thursday, Friday. We're down to very minimal amounts of that. The public accepted that and participated in it and joining in to help make it safe and easy.

Michael Grant:
All right. Paul Blue from Sky Harbor. We appreciate the information.

Paul Blue:
Thanks.

Michael Grant:
Imagine not being able to eat many foods most people enjoy: breads, pastas, cookies, even soy sauce. That is what people with celiac disease face. The illness used to be considered a rare disease but not anymore. Unfortunately, as Pam White reports, many of people are still undiagnosed.

Pam White:
Colleen has a lot in common with a famous family member.

Colleen Bedeman:
My uncle is Gene Kelly of "Singing in the Rain" and my father was Fred Kelly of Broadway which is where I grew up. I've been performing since I was a year old. It comes naturally, but I enjoy the teaching aspect best.

Pam White:
She inherited a love for show business but she inherited something else. Fortunately nothing else someone in the immediate family shares. It's called celiac disease.

Colleen Bedeman:
Wheat to a celiac is a carcinogen. At some point it wipes out your intestinal tract.

Pam White:
It damages the small intestine. The only treatment is the gluten free diet.

Melissa Diane Smith:
Barley, wheats and oats and additives. It's hidden in common food products from soy sauce to some teas.

Pam White:
Melissa Diane Smith is a nutritional counselor, health educator and author of "Going Against the Grain."

Melissa Diane Smith:
The body reacts so strongly to gluten, protein and wheat and other common grains that it actually starts to destroy the normal brush-like lining of the small intestine.

Pam White:
Smith says celiac disease can be difficult to detect because it presents from migraines to gastrointestinal disorders. Today there are much easier ways to test for it.

Melissa Diane Smith:
There are blood tests recently made available that test your body's immune response or the anti-bodies it produces to gluten.

Pam White:
Celiac disease is not a reaction like lactose intolerance. If left untreated, it can manifest into serious problems.

Melissa Diane Smith:
One is the longer a person with celiac disease keeps eating gluten and undiagnosed, the more they can develop autoimmune diseases. It could be thyroid and liver or rheumatoid arthritis. You could actually get autoimmune diseases.

Pam White:
She didn't have obviously symptoms for years until something triggered her and almost killed her.

Colleen Bedeman:
I could eat three spaghetti dinners and a loaf of garlic bread and ask for a dessert menu. It wiped out my intestinal track and I was dieing of malnutrition. That's when they decided something had to be done and try this bizarre diet.

Pam White:
For 23 years she's been on a gluten-free diet. A diet that's easier to follow because of new products and improved labeling. But she still has to watch out.

Colleen Bedeman:
My children grew up knowing if they put the knife in the mayonnaise jar and wipe it on the bread it does not go back in the jar or it contaminates the mayonnaise.

Pam White:
In a recent study the perception that celiac disease is rare is changing. In fact it's estimated 1 in every 250 people in the U.S. has it.

Melissa Diane Smith:
Doctors originally when they went through training were taught it's very rare occurring in one in 7,000 people or something like that. It turns out that these newly developed blood tests have been able to show that it's much more common than anybody ever realized.

Pam White:
Cause is unknown but there is a treatment, a gluten-free diet. So Smith and Bedeman are trying to raise awareness to encourage early detection and prevention.

Colleen Bedeman:
We want to put together a booklet to give to the doctors so they can understand how simple diagnoses can be and the testing is no longer the big expense.

Melissa Diane Smith:
I think it's important when people have unexplained illness, to think about this, to get the idea that grains might not always be good for every person.

Larry Lemmons:
Democratic senatorial candidate Jim Pederson will talk about where he stands on the issues on the campaign with the seat with Jon Kyl and changes these Election Day and hand counts for electronic voting in remedy for long lines.

Michael Grant:
And next following Horizon, stay tuned for "Arizona stories". Among tonight's stories: La Posada, Frank Luke, and. St. Mary's Basilica. "Arizona stories," tales of our unique people, places and history airs every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. thanks for joining us this evening. I'm Michael Grant. Have a great one. Good night.

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